Definition of Nitrogen

1. Noun. A common nonmetallic element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless inert diatomic gas; constitutes 78 percent of the atmosphere by volume; a constituent of all living tissues.

Exact synonyms: Atomic Number 7, N
Generic synonyms: Chemical Element, Element, Gas
Specialized synonyms: Azote, Liquid Nitrogen
Substance meronyms: Air
Derivative terms: Nitrify, Nitrogenize, Nitrogenous



Definition of Nitrogen

1. n. A colorless nonmetallic element, tasteless and odorless, comprising four fifths of the atmosphere by volume. It is chemically very inert in the free state, and as such is incapable of supporting life (hence the name azote still used by French chemists); but it forms many important compounds, as ammonia, nitric acid, the cyanides, etc, and is a constituent of all organized living tissues, animal or vegetable. Symbol N. Atomic weight 14. It was formerly regarded as a permanent noncondensible gas, but was liquefied in 1877 by Cailletet of Paris, and Pictet of Geneva.

Definition of Nitrogen

1. Noun. A chemical element (''symbol'' N) with an atomic number of 7 and atomic weight of 14.0067. ¹

2. Noun. Molecular nitrogen (N2), a colorless, odorless gas at room temperature. ¹

3. Noun. A specific nitrogen within a chemical formula, or a specific isotope of nitrogen ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Nitrogen

1. a gaseous element [n -S]

Medical Definition of Nitrogen

1. A colourless nonmetallic element, tasteless and odorless, comprising four fifths of the atmosphere by volume. It is chemically very inert in the free state, and as such is incapable of supporting life (hence the name azote still used by French chemists); but it forms many important compounds, as ammonia, nitric acid, the cyanides, etc, and is a constituent of all organised living tissues, animal or vegetable. Symbol N. Atomic weight 14. It was formerly regarded as a permanent noncondensible gas, but was liquefied in 1877 by Cailletet of Paris, and Pictet of Geneva. Origin: L. Nitrum natron + -gen: cf. F. Nitrogene. See Niter. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Nitrogen

nitrocellulose paper
nitrocelluloses
nitrochalk
nitrochloroform
nitrochloromethane
nitrocotton
nitroethane
nitroform
nitrofural
nitrofuran
nitrofurans
nitrofurantoin
nitrofurantoin polyneuropathy
nitrofurazone
nitrogelatin
nitrogen (current term)
nitrogen-13
nitrogen-14
nitrogen-15
nitrogen-fixing
nitrogen balance
nitrogen compounds
nitrogen cycle
nitrogen dioxide
nitrogen distribution
nitrogen equivalent
nitrogen fixation
nitrogen fixer
nitrogen group
nitrogen inversion

Literary usage of Nitrogen

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Monographic Medicine by William Robie Patten Emerson, Guido Guerrini, William Brown, Wendell Christopher Phillips, John Whitridge Williams, John Appleton Swett, Hans Günther, Mario Mariotti, Hugh Grant Rowell (1916)
"Since nitrogen is present in proteins in fairly constant amount (16 per cent), it is customary to measure total protein metabolism by the nitrogen of the ..."

2. Biennial Report by South Dakota, California State Board of Horticulture, State Athletic Commission (1890)
"that the pease and lucerne must have had access to a much richer source of nitrogen than the other plants. While the yield of barley, spurrey, wheat, ..."

3. Elements of the Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates by Gustav Mann, Walther Löb, Henry William Frederic Lorenz, Robert Wiedersheim, William Newton Parker, Thomas Jeffery Parker, Harry Clary Jones, Sunao Tawara, Leverett White Brownell, Max Julius Louis Le Blanc, Willis Rodney Whitney, John Wesley Brown, Wi (1906)
"The nitrogen Radicals of the Albumin-molecule To facilitate the difficult quantitative estimation of dissociation- products, attempts have repeatedly been ..."

4. Forest Physiography: Physiography of the United States and Principles of by Isaiah Bowman (1911)
"To be available to plants nitrogen must be in soluble form, ... The main source of nitrogen is humus, whence it is derived chiefly by bacterial action; ..."

5. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1884)
"Even if we allow them their full value, however, they do not in all cases cover the entire loss of nitrogen. Ou the basis of the results just described, ..."

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