Definition of Sieve

1. Noun. A strainer for separating lumps from powdered material or grading particles.

Exact synonyms: Screen
Specialized synonyms: Riddle, Sifter
Generic synonyms: Strainer
Derivative terms: Screen, Sift



2. Verb. Examine in order to test suitability. "Screen the job applicants"
Exact synonyms: Screen, Screen Out, Sort
Generic synonyms: Choose, Pick Out, Select, Take
Derivative terms: Screener, Screening, Sort

3. Verb. Check and sort carefully. "Sift the information"
Exact synonyms: Sift
Generic synonyms: Analyse, Analyze, Canvas, Canvass, Examine, Study

4. Verb. Separate by passing through a sieve or other straining device to separate out coarser elements. "Sift the flour"
Exact synonyms: Sift, Strain
Generic synonyms: Separate
Specialized synonyms: Rice, Resift, Riddle, Screen, Fan, Winnow
Also: Sieve Out
Derivative terms: Sifter, Sifting, Strainer

5. Verb. Distinguish and separate out. "Sift through the job candidates"
Exact synonyms: Sift
Generic synonyms: Choose, Pick Out, Select, Take

Definition of Sieve

1. n. A utensil for separating the finer and coarser parts of a pulverized or granulated substance from each other. It consist of a vessel, usually shallow, with the bottom perforated, or made of hair, wire, or the like, woven in meshes.

Definition of Sieve

1. Noun. A device to separate larger objects from smaller objects, or to separate solid objects from a liquid. ¹

2. Noun. A process, physical or abstract, that arrives at a final result by filtering out unwanted pieces of input from a larger starting set of input. ¹

3. Verb. To strain, sift or sort using a sieve. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Sieve

1. to pass through a sieve (a utensil for separating the coarse parts from the fine parts of loose matter) [v SIEVED, SIEVING, SIEVES]

Medical Definition of Sieve

1. 1. A utensil for separating the finer and coarser parts of a pulverized or granulated substance from each other. It consist of a vessel, usually shallow, with the bottom perforated, or made of hair, wire, or the like, woven in meshes. "In a sieve thrown and sifted." 2. A kind of coarse basket. Sieve cells, cribriform cells. See Cribriform. Origin: OE. Sive, AS. Sife; akin to D. Zeef, zift, OHG. Sib, G. Sieb. A. Cf. Sift. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Sieve Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Sieve

sierra leone
sierran
sierras
sies
siesmicity
siesta
siestaed
siestaing
siestas
sieth
sieths
sieur
sieurs
sieva
sieva bean
sieve (current term)
sieve-tube element
sieve bone
sieve graft
sieve of Eratosthenes
sieve out
sieve plate
sieve tube
sieved
sieveful
sievefuls
sievelike
sievert
sieverts
sieves

Literary usage of Sieve

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Report of the Annual Meeting (1904)
"The dunes can be fixed by the binders, but temporarily only, till the supply of sand from the sea is cut off. 7. The Histology of the sieve Tubes of ..."

2. Handbook of Practical Botany: For the Botanical Laboratory and Private Student by Eduard Strasburger (1887)
"This latter permits the colour to remain only in the sieve-areas, ... The sieve-areas cannot now be overlooked in a microscopical examination. ..."

3. The world's wit and humor: an encyclopedia of the classic wit and humor of by Lionel Strachey (1906)
"(Accidentally stamps on the edge of a sieve lying upon the floor. The sieve turns up sharply, and strikes his shin-bone.) Hu-hul My leg! My leg ! ..."

4. A Text Book of Ore Dressing by Robert Hallowell Richards, Earl Smith Bardwell, Edwin G. Goodwin (1909)
"sieve SCALE. — The list of successive screen sizes used in any mill, taken in order from coarsest to finest, is called the sieve scale. ..."

5. Observations on the Popular Antiquities of Great Britain: Chiefly by John Brand, Henry Ellis (1901)
"569 : " Th' oracle of sieve and shear», That turns as certain as the spheres." In the Athenian Oracle, ii. 309, the divination by sieve and shears is called ..."

6. The world's wit and humor: an encyclopedia of the classic wit and humor of by Lionel Strachey (1906)
"The sieve turns up sharply, and strikes his shin-bone.) Hu-hu ! ... That cursed sieve! Yes, what is that sieve doing here, you daughter of Belial? Ciba. ..."

7. Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society by Royal Microscopical Society, London (1882)
"will sometimes produce from two to four sieve-tube-cells by transverse division, and production of sieve-plates on the transverse walls. ..."

8. Annals of Botany by IDEAL (Project) (1888)
"in the various species of Macrocystis, the sieve-plates being, for the most part horizontally placed, dividing up the sieve-tube into members. ..."

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