Definition of Profligacy

1. Noun. The trait of spending extravagantly.

Exact synonyms: Extravagance, Prodigality
Generic synonyms: Improvidence, Shortsightedness
Derivative terms: Extravagant, Prodigal



2. Noun. Dissolute indulgence in sensual pleasure.

Definition of Profligacy

1. n. The quality of state of being profligate; a profligate or very vicious course of life; a state of being abandoned in moral principle and in vice; dissoluteness.

Definition of Profligacy

1. Noun. Careless wastefulness. ¹

2. Noun. Shameless and immoral behaviour. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Profligacy

1. [n -CIES]

Profligacy Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Profligacy

profiteroles
profiters
profitest
profiteth
profiting
profitings
profitless
profitlessly
profitlessness
profitmaking
profits
profitseeking
profitwise
proflavine
profligacies
profligacy (current term)
profligate
profligated
profligately
profligateness
profligates
profligating
profligation
profligatory
profluence
profluent
proform
proforma
proformas
proforms

Literary usage of Profligacy

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle by Aristotle (1891)
"profligacy seems to be more voluntary than i cowardice. ... profligacy is for these reasons more to be blamed than cowardice, and for another reason too, ..."

2. The Works of Hannah More by Hannah More (1835)
"But surely the transition from profligacy to persecution is no great improve, ment in the human character. Were not hie false virtues even more destructive ..."

3. Roman History: The Early Empire, from the Assassination of Julius Cæsar to by William Wolfe Capes (1897)
"To these causes must be added the untoward influence of luxury, profligacy, and crime. Polybius noted 5. Influence , j- r i_ the physical effects of the ..."

4. Memoirs of the Court of England During the Reign of the Stuarts,: Including by John Heneage Jesse (1855)
"In their sweeping charges of profligacy, indolence, and ingratitude, they have divested him of the few better feelings and principles, ..."

5. Roman History: The Early Empire, from the Assassination of Julius Cæsar to by William Wolfe Capes (1895)
"To these causes must be added the untoward influence of luxury, profligacy, and crime. Polybius noted the physical effects of the foreign customs of vice"™" ..."

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