Definition of Prunus dasycarpa

1. Noun. Small hybrid apricot of Asia and Asia Minor having purplish twigs and white flowers following by inferior purple fruit.

Exact synonyms: Black Apricot, Purple Apricot
Group relationships: Genus Prunus, Prunus
Generic synonyms: Apricot, Apricot Tree



Lexicographical Neighbors of Prunus Dasycarpa

Prunus alleghaniensis
Prunus americana
Prunus amygdalus
Prunus angustifolia
Prunus armeniaca
Prunus avium
Prunus besseyi
Prunus capuli
Prunus caroliniana
Prunus cerasifera
Prunus cerasus
Prunus cerasus austera
Prunus cerasus caproniana
Prunus cerasus marasca
Prunus cuneata
Prunus dasycarpa
Prunus demissa
Prunus domestica
Prunus domestica insititia
Prunus dulcis
Prunus dulcis amara
Prunus glandulosa
Prunus ilicifolia
Prunus incisa
Prunus insititia
Prunus japonica
Prunus laurocerasus
Prunus lyonii
Prunus maritima
Prunus mexicana

Literary usage of Prunus dasycarpa

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Principles of Fruit-growing, with Applications to Practice by Liberty Hyde Bailey (1915)
"Purple apricot, prunus dasycarpa. *Orchard, an inclosure, assemblage or plantation of fruit trees. Oranges are commonly said to be grown in "groves. ..."

2. The Principles of Fruit-growing, with Applications to Practice by Liberty Hyde Bailey (1915)
"Purple apricot, prunus dasycarpa. "Orchard, an inclosure, assemblage or plantation of fruit trees. Oranges are commonly said to be grown in "groves. ..."

3. The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture: A Discussion for the Amateur, and by Liberty Hyde Bailey (1914)
"(3) The third species is the purple or black apricot, prunus dasycarpa, which is little cult. : fr. globular and somewhat plum- like, with a distinct st., ..."

4. Cyclopedia of American Horticulture: Comprising Suggestions for Cultivation by Liberty Hyde Bailey, Wilhelm Miller (1900)
"The third species is the purple or black apricot, prunus dasycarpa, which is little cultivated : fr. globular and somewhat plum-like, with a distinct stem, ..."

5. The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America: Or, The Culture, Propagation, and by Andrew Jackson Downing (1845)
"(It was indeed called prunus dasycarpa by the old botanists.) It is pretty good, and very hardy, and its unique appearance renders it sought after by ..."

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