Definition of Illusion

1. Noun. An erroneous mental representation.

Exact synonyms: Semblance
Specialized synonyms: Apparition, Fantasm, Phantasm, Phantasma, Phantom, Shadow, Irradiation, Phantom Limb
Generic synonyms: Appearance
Derivative terms: Illusional



2. Noun. Something many people believe that is false. "They have the illusion that I am very wealthy"
Exact synonyms: Fancy, Fantasy, Phantasy
Generic synonyms: Misconception
Specialized synonyms: Bubble, Ignis Fatuus, Will-o'-the-wisp, Wishful Thinking
Derivative terms: Fancy, Fantasize, Fantasy, Illusional, Illusory

3. Noun. The act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas.
Exact synonyms: Delusion, Head Game
Generic synonyms: Deceit, Deception, Dissembling, Dissimulation
Derivative terms: Delude, Illusional, Illusionary

4. Noun. An illusory feat; considered magical by naive observers.

Definition of Illusion

1. n. An unreal image presented to the bodily or mental vision; a deceptive appearance; a false show; mockery; hallucination.

Definition of Illusion

1. Noun. Anything that seems to be something that it is not. ¹

2. Noun. A misapprehension; a belief in something that is in fact not true. ¹

3. Noun. A magician’s trick. ¹

4. Noun. The fact of being an illusion (in any of the above senses). (rfex this is totally unclear to me) ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Illusion

1. a false perception [n -S]

Medical Definition of Illusion

1. 1. An unreal image presented to the bodily or mental vision; a deceptive appearance; a false show; mockery; hallucination. "To cheat the eye with blear illusions." (Milton) 2. Hence: Anything agreeably fascinating and charning; enchantment; witchery; glamour. "Ye soft illusions, dear deceits, arise!" (Pope) 3. A sensation originated by some external object, but so modified as in any way to lead to an erroneous perception; as when the rolling of a wagon is mistaken for thunder. Some modern writers distinguish between an illusion and hallucination, regarding the former as originating with some external object, and the latter as having no objective occasion whatever. Illusion refers particularly to errors of the sense, delusion to false hopes or deceptions of the mind. An optical deception is an illusion, a false opinion is a delusion. Synonym: Delusion, mockery, deception, chimera, fallacy. Origin: F. Illusion, L. Illusio, fr. Illudere, illusum, to illude. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Illusion

illuministic
illuminists
illuminize
illuminized
illuminizes
illuminizing
illuminometer
illuminometers
illuminous
illupi
illupis
illure
illured
illures
illuring
illusion (current term)
illusion of doubles
illusion of movement
illusionable
illusional
illusionary
illusioned
illusionism
illusionisms
illusionist
illusionistic
illusionistically
illusionists
illusionless
illusionlike

Literary usage of Illusion

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The British Journal of Psychology by British Psychological Society (1913)
"(c) Effects of practice upon the illusion; disappearance of the illusion with ... (d) Variation of the illusion with the number of divisions in the filed ..."

2. Psychological Review by American Psychological Association (1895)
"The illusion was good, though the absence of centrifugal force, and the fact that the swing did ... Many persons were actually made sick by the illusion. ..."

3. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1890)
"It is this illusion that give« rue to the unreal world of duality, generable, mutable, ... It is illusion that projects the manifold of experience, ..."

4. The Works of Charles Lamb: to which are prefixed his letters, and a sketch by Charles Lamb (1871)
"STAGE illusion. A PLAY is said to be well or ill acted, in proportion to the ... Whether such illusion can in any case be perfect, is not the question. ..."

5. Psychology: General Introduction by Charles Hubbard Judd (1907)
"Zollner illusion. The long lines are parallel with each other. too distracting to permit the ordinary observer to recognize the true relations between the ..."

6. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1898)
"A quantitative study of this illusion has shown that for each angle made by the two obliques a maximum of illusion is reached with a particular length of ..."

Other Resources:

Search for Illusion on Dictionary.com!Search for Illusion on Thesaurus.com!Search for Illusion on Google!Search for Illusion on Wikipedia!

Search