Definition of Gloam

1. Noun. The time of day immediately following sunset. "They finished before the fall of night"

Exact synonyms: Crepuscle, Crepuscule, Dusk, Evenfall, Fall, Gloaming, Nightfall, Twilight
Group relationships: Eve, Even, Evening, Eventide
Specialized synonyms: Night
Generic synonyms: Hour, Time Of Day
Derivative terms: Crepuscular, Crepuscular, Dusky



Definition of Gloam

1. v. i. To begin to grow dark; to grow dusky.

2. n. The twilight; gloaming.

Definition of Gloam

1. Noun. (obsolete) gloaming, twilight ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Gloam

1. twilight [n -S] - See also: twilight

Lexicographical Neighbors of Gloam

glittering
glittering generalities
glittering generality
glitteringly
glitters
glittery
glitz
glitzed
glitzes
glitzier
glitziest
glitzily
glitzing
glitzy
gloak
gloam (current term)
gloaming
gloamings
gloams
gloat
gloated
gloater
gloaters
gloating
gloatingly
gloats
glob
global
global aphasia
global climate change

Literary usage of Gloam

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose by Alphonso Gerald Newcomer, Alice Ebba Andrews (1910)
"I saw their starved lips in the gloam With horrid warning gaped wide— And I awoke, and found me here, On the cold hill's side. ..."

2. The Gentleman's Magazine (1877)
"Well, now, as touching Scholar gloam, he died nigh a score of years ago; ... When I knew Scholar gloam, he was a middling-sized, slender-built young ..."

3. The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language by William Dwight Whitney (1889)
"To grow dark: as, it begins to gloam.— 2f. To be sullen ; gloom. gloaming (glo'ming), и. and a. [A dial. var. of (/looming, which, though little used in ..."

4. Notes to Palgrave's Golden Treasury of Songs & Lyrics. Books I-IV. by John Henry Fowler (1904)
"41. gloam. There is a substantive'gloaming,'evening twilight, and also a verb 'to gloam,' to ... The form 'gloam' as substantive is Keats' own invention. ..."

5. Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose by Alphonso Gerald Newcomer, Alice Ebba Andrews (1910)
"I saw their starved lips in the gloam With horrid warning gaped wide— And I awoke, and found me here, On the cold hill's side. ..."

6. The Gentleman's Magazine (1877)
"Well, now, as touching Scholar gloam, he died nigh a score of years ago; ... When I knew Scholar gloam, he was a middling-sized, slender-built young ..."

7. The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language by William Dwight Whitney (1889)
"To grow dark: as, it begins to gloam.— 2f. To be sullen ; gloom. gloaming (glo'ming), и. and a. [A dial. var. of (/looming, which, though little used in ..."

8. Notes to Palgrave's Golden Treasury of Songs & Lyrics. Books I-IV. by John Henry Fowler (1904)
"41. gloam. There is a substantive'gloaming,'evening twilight, and also a verb 'to gloam,' to ... The form 'gloam' as substantive is Keats' own invention. ..."

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