Definition of Crimson clover

1. Noun. Southern European annual with spiky heads of crimson flower; extensively cultivated in United States for forage.

Exact synonyms: Italian Clover, Trifolium Incarnatum
Generic synonyms: Clover, Trefoil

Lexicographical Neighbors of Crimson Clover

crimped
crimper
crimpers
crimpier
crimpiest
crimping
crimple
crimpled
crimples
crimpling
crimpness
crimps
crimpy
crims
crimson
crimson clover (current term)
crimsoned
crimsoning
crimsonly
crimsonness
crimsons
crinal
crinate
crinated
crincum-crancum
crincum-crancums
crine
crined
crines
crinet

Literary usage of Crimson clover

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Bulletin by North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station (Fargo) (1899)
"crimson clover is an annual plant, ie, lives but one year like wheat and oats. ... This is an annual clover almost identified with crimson clover. ..."

2. Biennial Report by Oregon Board of Horticulture (1905)
"This winter-killing of crimson clover was quite common throughout the northern part ... crimson clover is the great soil enricher and is often used as the ..."

3. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1896)
"crimson clover GOOD FOR POTATOES. IN Bulletin No. ... that crimson clover plowed under increased the yield in 1894 thirty-six and in 1895 fifty per cent. ..."

4. Forage Plants and Their Culture by Charles Vancouver Piper (1914)
"crimson clover (Fig. 48) is also known from the color of its flowers as scarlet, ... crimson clover was probably first cultivated in southern France and ..."

5. Poems by Edna Dean Proctor (1890)
"A crimson clover. THE maples dropped their withered leaves; Wan, through the mist, the sunset shone; And from the upland, hare of sheaves, The jay's call ..."

6. European Agriculture and Rural Economy: From personal observation by Henry Colman (1851)
"crimson clover, ( Trifolium Incarnatum.) — This is an annual plant, presenting, in its blossoming, a beautiful crimson flower in the shape of a cone. ..."

7. Annual Report by Entomological Society of Ontario, Ontario. Dept. of Agriculture (1899)
"It seems evident, however, that the lice are attacked by a parasite while still in crimson clover (parasitized lice were abo common on red clover), ..."

8. Bulletin by North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station (Fargo) (1899)
"crimson clover is an annual plant, ie, lives but one year like wheat and oats. ... This is an annual clover almost identified with crimson clover. ..."

9. Biennial Report by Oregon Board of Horticulture (1905)
"This winter-killing of crimson clover was quite common throughout the northern part ... crimson clover is the great soil enricher and is often used as the ..."

10. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1896)
"crimson clover GOOD FOR POTATOES. IN Bulletin No. ... that crimson clover plowed under increased the yield in 1894 thirty-six and in 1895 fifty per cent. ..."

11. Forage Plants and Their Culture by Charles Vancouver Piper (1914)
"crimson clover (Fig. 48) is also known from the color of its flowers as scarlet, ... crimson clover was probably first cultivated in southern France and ..."

12. Poems by Edna Dean Proctor (1890)
"A crimson clover. THE maples dropped their withered leaves; Wan, through the mist, the sunset shone; And from the upland, hare of sheaves, The jay's call ..."

13. European Agriculture and Rural Economy: From personal observation by Henry Colman (1851)
"crimson clover, ( Trifolium Incarnatum.) — This is an annual plant, presenting, in its blossoming, a beautiful crimson flower in the shape of a cone. ..."

14. Annual Report by Entomological Society of Ontario, Ontario. Dept. of Agriculture (1899)
"It seems evident, however, that the lice are attacked by a parasite while still in crimson clover (parasitized lice were abo common on red clover), ..."

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