Definition of Tuscan order

1. Noun. A Roman order that resembles the Doric order but without a fluted shaft.

Generic synonyms: Order



Lexicographical Neighbors of Tuscan Order

Turner's tooth
Turneresque
Turnicidae
Turnix sylvatica
Turritis
Turritis glabra
Tursiops
Tursiops gilli
Tursiops truncatus
Turtlemania
Tusayan
Tuscaloosa
Tuscan
Tuscan order (current term)
Tuscany
Tuscarora
Tuscaroras
Tuskegee
Tussaud
Tussilago
Tussilago alpina
Tussilago farfara
Tutankhamen
Tutankhamon
Tutelo
Tutsi
Tutte matrices
Tutte matrix

Literary usage of Tuscan order

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Practical Draughtsman's Book of Industrial Design and Machinist's and by Charles A. Armengaud, William Johnson, Jules Amouroux (1854)
"The whole height of the Tuscan order is 22 modules 2 parts, apportioned as follows : — The column is 14 modules; the pedestal, 4 modules 8 parts; ..."

2. International Library of Technology: A Series of Textbooks for Persons by International Textbook Company (1902)
"The Tuscan order, Fig. 15, is of doubtful origin, and was probably never very extensively used. Massive in appearance and severe in its outlines, ..."

3. The Rudiments of Architecture and Building for the Use of Architects by John Bullock (1865)
"Tuscan order. Cavetto. This Order is derived CoT<"a'- from the Doric ... The Tuscan Order has been differently treated by different Architects, ..."

4. International Library of Technology: A Series of Textbooks for Persons by International Textbook Company (1905)
"TABLE OF THE Tuscan order— PLATES V, VI, AND VII i D equals height of Plinth. , [height of Cornice, i Z? equals] , (.projection of Cornice. i D equals i D ..."

5. Shaw's Civil Architecture: Being a Complete Theoretical and Practical System by Edward Shaw (1852)
"Tuscan order. The Romans added the Tuscan, or Etruscan, to the three Grecian orders, as they subsequently did the Composite. ..."

6. London: Being an Accurate History and Description of the British Metropolis by David Hughson (1807)
"... is four hundred feet long, with an ambulatory in front of three hundred and forty feet, under a piazza, elevated on stone columns of the Tuscan order. ..."

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