Definition of Tragedy

1. Noun. An event resulting in great loss and misfortune. "The earthquake was a disaster"




2. Noun. Drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or circumstance; excites terror or pity.
Generic synonyms: Drama
Specialized synonyms: Tragicomedy
Antonyms: Comedy
Derivative terms: Tragic

Definition of Tragedy

1. n. A dramatic poem, composed in elevated style, representing a signal action performed by some person or persons, and having a fatal issue; that species of drama which represents the sad or terrible phases of character and life.

Definition of Tragedy

1. Noun. A drama or similar work, in which the main character is brought to ruin or otherwise suffers the extreme consequences of some tragic flaw or weakness of character. ¹

2. Noun. The genre of such works, and the art of producing them. ¹

3. Noun. A disastrous event, especially one involving great loss of life or injury. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Tragedy

1. a disastrous event [n -DIES]

Tragedy Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Tragedy

tragacanth
tragacantha
tragacanths
tragal
tragedian
tragedians
tragedie
tragedienne
tragediennes
tragedies
tragedious
tragedize
tragedized
tragedizes
tragedizing
tragedy (current term)
tragedy of the commons
tragematopolist
tragematopolists
tragi
tragic
tragic flaw
tragic hero
tragic heroes
tragical
tragicality
tragically
tragicalness
tragick
tragicness

Literary usage of Tragedy

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1919)
"The very variety of 'King Lear' is bewildering: there is a combination in the play of the fable, the fairy story, the chronicle history and the tragedy of ..."

2. The Cambridge History of English Literature by Adolphus William Ward, Alfred Rayney Waller (1910)
"CHAPTER IV Early English tragedy rrI ^HE history of renascence tragedy may be divided into I three stages, not definitely limited, and not following in ..."

3. A Life of William Shakespeare by Sidney Lee (1916)
"With his advance in years there came in comedy and tragedy alike a larger ... Ultimately, tragedy rather than comedy gave him the requisite scope for the ..."

4. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"Soon afterwards, in the Frogs, Aristophanes pronounced the epitaph of Attic Comedy on Attic tragedy. In an age which is not yet ripe for reflection hil ..."

5. European Theories of the Drama: An Anthology of Dramatic Theory and by Barrett Harper Clark (1918)
"In common with other theorists, he upheld the dignity of tragedy, ... Although such things are the proper material for tragedy, they would only remind us of ..."

6. The Observer by Richard Cumberland (1822)
"As to Plato's general assertion with respect to the high antiquity of the Athenian tragedy, it seems thrown out as a paradox, which he does not attempt to ..."

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