Definition of Theory of gravity

1. Noun. (physics) the theory that any two particles of matter attract one another with a force directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.




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Lexicographical Neighbors of Theory Of Gravity

theorized
theorizer
theorizers
theorizes
theorizing
theorizings
theory
theory-based
theory-laden
theory of dissociation
theory of electrolytic dissociation
theory of everything
theory of evolution
theory of games
theory of gravitation
theory of gravity (current term)
theory of indicators
theory of inheritance
theory of knowledge
theory of medicine
theory of organic evolution
theory of preformation
theory of punctuated equilibrium
theory of relativity
theoryless
theosis
theosoph
theosopher
theosophers
theosophic

Literary usage of Theory of gravity

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann, Edward Aloysius Pace, Condé Bénoist Pallen, Thomas Joseph Shahan, John Joseph Wynne (1913)
"Aristotle maintained the simultaneous existence of several worlds to be an absurdity, his principal argument being drawn from his theory of gravity, ..."

2. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"This theory of gravity appeared in the writings of Jean Buridan of ... —If the School of Paris completely transformed the Peripatetic theory of gravity, ..."

3. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"This theory of gravity appeared in the writings of Jean Buridan of ... —If the School of Paris completely transformed the Peripatetic theory of gravity, ..."

4. American Edition of the British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of Arts and ...by William Nicholson by William Nicholson (1819)
"... has heen greatly cultivated by mathematicians, on account of its extensive use in the theory of gravity, and other physical and mathematical sciences. ..."

5. The Mathematical Principles of Mechanical Philosophy and Their Application by John Henry Pratt (1842)
"... to depend on the theory of gravity, it was neglected by most astronomers ; till a more thorough examination led Laplace to discover that its cause is ..."

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