Definition of Telescope

1. Noun. A magnifier of images of distant objects.

Exact synonyms: Scope
Terms within: Aperture, Finder, View Finder, Viewfinder, Optical Prism, Prism
Specialized synonyms: Astronomical Telescope, Collimator, Equatorial, Solar Telescope, Transit Instrument
Generic synonyms: Magnifier
Derivative terms: Telescopic, Telescopic



2. Verb. Crush together or collapse. "My hiking sticks telescope and can be put into the backpack"
Generic synonyms: Crush, Mash, Squash, Squeeze, Squelch

3. Verb. Make smaller or shorter. "The novel was telescoped into a short play"
Generic synonyms: Concentrate, Condense, Digest

Definition of Telescope

1. n. An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies.

2. a. To slide or pass one within another, after the manner of the sections of a small telescope or spyglass; to come into collision, as railway cars, in such a manner that one runs into another.

3. v. t. To cause to come into collision, so as to telescope.

4. a. Capable of being extended or compacted, like a telescope, by the sliding of joints or parts one within the other; telescopic; as, a telescope bag; telescope table, etc.

Definition of Telescope

1. Noun. A monocular optical instrument possessing magnification for observing distant objects, especially in astronomy. ¹

2. Noun. Any instrument used in astronomy for observing distant objects (such as a radio telescope). ¹

3. Verb. To extend or contract in the manner of a telescope. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Telescope

1. [v -SCOPED, -SCOPING, -SCOPES]

Medical Definition of Telescope

1. To slide or pass one within another, after the manner of the sections of a small telescope or spyglass; to come into collision, as railway cars, in such a manner that one runs into another. Origin: Telescoped; Telescoping. To cause to come into collision, so as to telescope. An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies. A telescope assists the eye chiefly in two ways; first, by enlarging the visual angle under which a distant object is seen, and thus magnifying that object; and, secondly, by collecting, and conveying to the eye, a larger beam of light than would enter the naked organ, thus rendering objects distinct and visible which would otherwise be indistinct and or invisible. Its essential parts are the object glass, or concave mirror, which collects the beam of light, and forms an image of the object, and the eyeglass, which is a microscope, by which the image is magnified. Achromatic telescope. See Achromatic. Aplanatic telescope, a telescope having an aplanatic eyepiece. Astronomical telescope, a telescope which has a simple eyepiece so constructed or used as not to reverse the image formed by the object glass, and consequently exhibits objects inverted, which is not a hindrance in astronomical observations. Cassegrainian telescope, a reflecting telescope invented by Cassegrain, which differs from the Gregorian only in having the secondary speculum convex instead of concave, and placed nearer the large speculum. The Cassegrainian represents objects inverted; the Gregorian, in their natural position. The Melbourne telescope is a Cassegrainian telescope. Dialytic telescope. See Dialytic. Equatorial telescope. See the Note under Equatorial. Galilean telescope, a refracting telescope in which the eyeglass is a concave instead of a convex lens, as in the common opera glass. This was the construction originally adopted by Galileo, the inventor of the instrument. It exhibits the objects erect, that is, in their natural positions. Gregorian telescope, a form of reflecting telescope. See Gregorian. Herschelian telescope, a reflecting telescope of the form invented by Sir William Herschel, in which only one speculum is employed, by means of which an image of the object is formed near one side of the open end of the tube, and to this the eyeglass is applied directly. Newtonian telescope, a form of reflecting telescope. See Newtonian. Photographic telescope, a telescope specially constructed to make photographs of the heavenly bodies. Prism telescope. See Teinoscope. Reflecting telescope, a telescope in which the image is formed by a speculum or mirror (or usually by two speculums, a large one at the lower end of the telescope, and the smaller one near the open end) instead of an object glass. See Gregorian, Cassegrainian, Herschelian, and Newtonian, telescopes, above. Refracting telescope, a telescope in which the image is formed by refraction through an object glass. Telescope carp, a slender telescope attached to the barrel, having cross wires in the eyepiece and used as a sight. Terrestrial telescope, a telescope whose eyepiece has one or two lenses more than the astronomical, for the purpose of inverting the image, and exhibiting objects erect. Origin: Gr. Viewing afar, farseeing; far, far off + a watcher, akin to to view: cf. F. Telescope. See Telegraph, and -scope. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Telescope Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Telescope

telergic
telergies
telergy
telerobot
telerobotic
telerobotics
telerobots
teleroentgenography
teleroentgentherapy
telerythin
teles
telesale
telesales
telesatellite
telesatellites
telescope (current term)
telescope sight
telescoped
telescopefish
telescopefishes
telescopes
telescopic
telescopic denture
telescopic sight
telescopic spectacles
telescopic star
telescopical
telescopically
telescopies
telescoping

Literary usage of Telescope

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1920)
"Two piers are so set as to form a rigid and accurate support for these pivots, east and west, carrying the tube so that the movement of the telescope is in ..."

2. Cavendish by Christa Jungnickel, Russell McCormmach (1996)
"Christiaan Huygens. the builder of the telescope, had described its needs: "In ... The telescope had been given to the Royal Society in 1691 by Constantine ..."

3. Cavendish by Christa Jungnickel, Russell McCormmach (1996)
"Aerial telescope No sooner had Cavendish settled into his new house at Clapham Common than he took the first step toward erecting a large telescope on the ..."

4. Cavendish by Christa Jungnickel, Russell McCormmach (1996)
"Aerial telescope No sooner had Cavendish settled into his new house at Clapham Common than he took the first step toward erecting a large telescope on the ..."

5. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1918)
"The basin is set on a firm support on the ground under the telescope, and the latter is pointed directly downward. By mounting up to the eye-piece and ..."

6. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1920)
"The telescope is mounted after the English fashion, the skeleton tube ... The telescope has motor- driven fast and slow motions, while the diurnal motion is ..."

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