Definition of Tambour

1. Noun. A frame made of two hoops; used for embroidering.

Exact synonyms: Embroidery Frame, Embroidery Hoop
Generic synonyms: Framework



2. Noun. A drum.
Generic synonyms: Drum, Membranophone, Tympan

Definition of Tambour

1. n. A kind of small flat drum; a tambourine.

2. v. t. To embroider on a tambour.

Definition of Tambour

1. Noun. (obsolete) drum ¹

2. Noun. a circular frame for embroidery ¹

3. Noun. (architecture) the capital of a Corinthian column ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Tambour

1. to embroider on a round wooden frame [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Medical Definition of Tambour

1. 1. A kind of small flat drum; a tambourine. 2. A small frame, commonly circular, and somewhat resembling a tambourine, used for stretching, and firmly holding, a portion of cloth that is to be embroidered; also, the embroidery done upon such a frame; called also, in the latter sense, tambour work. 3. Same as Drum. 4. A work usually in the form of a redan, to inclose a space before a door or staircase, or at the gorge of a larger work. It is arranged like a stockade. 5. A shallow metallic cup or drum, with a thin elastic membrane supporting a writing lever. Two or more of these are connected by an India rubber tube, and used to transmit and register the movements of the pulse or of any pulsating artery. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Tambour Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Tambour

tamarugite
tamasha
tamashas
tambac
tambacs
tambak
tambaks
tambala
tambalas
tamber
tambers
tambon
tamborine
tambou
tambour (current term)
tambour sound
tamboura
tambouras
tamboured
tambourer
tambourers
tambourin
tambourine
tambourinelike
tambourines
tambouring
tambourinist
tambourinists
tambourins

Literary usage of Tambour

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language by William Dwight Whitney (1891)
"When I sound The tambour of Uod, ten cities hear Its voice, and answer to the ... Machines have been constructed for tambour-working, and are still used. ..."

2. A Text-book of physiology by Michael Foster (1891)
"The movements of the column of air in the trachea are transmitted to the tambour, the consequent expansions and ¬Ľnd contractions of which are transmitted to ..."

3. A Text Book of Physiology by Michael Foster (1893)
"The movements of the column of air in the trachea are transmitted to the tambour, the consequent expansions and cim tract ions of which are transmitted to ..."

4. A Text Book of Physiology by Michael Foster (1893)
"B. The tambour. The metal chamber m is covered in an air-tight manner with the indiarubber c, bearing a thin metal plate m' to which is attached the lever l ..."

5. A Text Book of Physiology by Michael Foster (1891)
"37 A, fashioned something like a sound, both tube and bag being filled with air, and the tube being connected with a recording ' tambour. ..."

6. A Text book of physiology by Michael Foster (1894)
"This consists essentially of a very small metal drum or tambour (Fig. ... The screw-tap on the tube leading, in the figure, up to the tambour, ..."

7. A Textbook of Physiology by Michael Foster (1888)
"37 A, fashioned something like a sound, both tube and bag being filled with air, and the tube being connected with a recording ' tambour. ..."

8. A Textbook of Human Physiology: Including a Section on Physiologic Apparatus. by Albert Philson Brubaker (1922)
"When the membrane of the first tambour is pressed or driven inward, the air is forced through the rubber tube into the second tambour and its membrane is ..."

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