Definition of Superpose

1. Verb. Place (one geometric figure) upon another so that their perimeters coincide.

Generic synonyms: Lay, Place, Pose, Position, Put, Set
Derivative terms: Superposition, Superposition



2. Verb. Place on top of. "Can you superimpose the two images?"
Exact synonyms: Lay Over, Superimpose
Specialized synonyms: Develop
Generic synonyms: Lay, Place, Pose, Position, Put, Set
Derivative terms: Superposition

Definition of Superpose

1. v. t. To lay upon, as one kind of rock on another.

Definition of Superpose

1. Verb. To place one thing on top of another ¹

2. Verb. (mathematics) To place one geometric figure on top of another in such a way that all common parts coincide ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Superpose

1. [v -POSED, -POSING, -POSES]

Superpose Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Superpose

superplusages
superpluses
superpolite
superpoliteness
superpolitic
superpolymer
superpolymers
superpolynomial
superpolynomials
superpopular
superpopulated
superport
superports
superposability
superposable
superpose (current term)
superposed
superposes
superposing
superposition
superposition principle
superpositioning
superpositions
superpotent
superpotential
superpotentials
superpower
superpowered
superpowerful
superpowerless

Literary usage of Superpose

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language by William Dwight Whitney (1891)
"[< superpose + -able.'} Capable of being superposed ; not interfering with one another, or not rendering one another impossible, as two displacements or ..."

2. Laboratory work in physiological chemistry by Frederick George Novy (1898)
"superpose as in Exp. 2, the spectrum of oxy-haemo- globin (1—50) for comparison. ... superpose the spectrum of oxy-haemoglobin and compare the two spectra. ..."

3. Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society by London Mathematical Society (1896)
"(0,l), cannot superpose the 5 squares of /?, y, 6 or of 6, ... Hence every square of C can superpose 3 squares of R and D, every square of R 3 squares of D. ..."

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