Definition of Sonority

1. Noun. Having the character of a loud deep sound; the quality of being resonant.




Definition of Sonority

1. n. The quality or state of being sonorous; sonorousness.

Definition of Sonority

1. Noun. The property of being sonorous. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Sonority

1. the quality or state of being sonorous [n -TIES]

Sonority Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Sonority

sonolite
sonolucent
sonoluminescence
sonometer
sonometers
sonomicrometer
sonomotor
sonomotor response
sonoporation
sonoraite
sonorant
sonorants
sonorific
sonorisation
sonorities
sonority (current term)
sonorization
sonorizations
sonorize
sonorized
sonorizes
sonorizing
sonorous
sonorous rale
sonorously
sonorousness
sonorousnesses
sonourous
sonovox
sonovoxes

Literary usage of Sonority

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. German Orthography and Phonology: A Treatise with a Word-list by George Hempl (1897)
"Stress is easily confounded, on the one hand, with sonority (§ 77), and, on the other, with pitch (§ 101); the more so as the degree of stress on various ..."

2. English Prose and Verse from Beowulf to Stevenson by Henry Spackman Pancoast (1915)
"... the actual sonority of the passage— __„_ v quences of vowels and consonants, too varying Sand delicate to be reproducible by rule al- (From "Virgil" in ..."

3. Madam Butterfly: A Japanese Tragedy by Giacomo Puccini, Luigi Illica, Giuseppe Giacosa (1906)
"The Steinway of half a century ago was the preferred instrument of the "maestro," because of its mechanical perfection and its melodious sweetness, sonority ..."

4. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh by Royal Society of Edinburgh (1900)
"The function of a consonant is to connect those stronger sounds together, so as to form waves of sonority, ie, syllables. Every syllable must have a vowel, ..."

5. Northern English: Phonetics, Grammar, Texts by Richard John Lloyd (1899)
"Force, ie stress, always increases sonority, so long as the phone remains the same. ... Yet relative sonority may be modified, and sometimes even reversed, ..."

6. Contributions to the Study of Elliptical Words in Modern English by Karl Sundén (1904)
"sonority in the last syllable than in the first. ... The negative side of the influence of sonority on ellipsis, which we have just touched on, ..."

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