Definition of Smite

1. Verb. Inflict a heavy blow on, with the hand, a tool, or a weapon. "The fighter managed to smite his opponent"

Generic synonyms: Hit



2. Verb. Affect suddenly with deep feeling. ; "He was smitten with love for this young girl"
Generic synonyms: Affect, Impress, Move, Strike

3. Verb. Cause physical pain or suffering in. "Afflict with the plague"
Exact synonyms: Afflict
Generic synonyms: Damage
Specialized synonyms: Visit, Blight, Plague
Derivative terms: Affliction, Afflictive

Definition of Smite

1. v. t. To strike; to inflict a blow upon with the hand, or with any instrument held in the hand, or with a missile thrown by the hand; as, to smite with the fist, with a rod, sword, spear, or stone.

2. v. i. To strike; to collide; to beat.

3. n. The act of smiting; a blow.

Definition of Smite

1. Verb. (archaic) To hit. ¹

2. Verb. To strike down or kill with godly force. ¹

3. Verb. To injure with divine power. ¹

4. Verb. (figuratively only in passive) To strike with love or infatuation. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Smite

1. to strike heavily [v SMOTE, SMIT or SMITTEN, SMITING, SMITES]

Medical Definition of Smite

1. 1. To strike; to inflict a blow upon with the hand, or with any instrument held in the hand, or with a missile thrown by the hand; as, to smite with the fist, with a rod, sword, spear, or stone. "Whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also." (Matt. V. 39) "And David . . . Took thence a stone, and slang it, and smote the Philistine in his forehead." (1 Sam. Xvii. 49) 2. To cause to strike; to use as an instrument in striking or hurling. "Profpesy, and smite thine hands together." (Ezek. Xxi. 14) "Saul . . . Smote the javelin into the wall." (1 Sam. Xix. 10) 3. To destroy the life of by beating, or by weapons of any kind; to slay by a blow; to kill; as, to smite one with the sword, or with an arrow or other instrument. 4. To put to rout in battle; to overthrow by war. 5. To blast; to destroy the life or vigor of, as by a stroke or by some visitation. "The flax and the barely was smitten." (Ex. Ix. 31) 6. To afflict; to chasten; to punish. "Let us not mistake God's goodness, nor imagine, because he smites us, that we are forsaken by him." (Wake) 7. To strike or affect with passion, as love or fear. "The charms that smite the simple heart." (Pope) "Smith with the love of sister arts we came." (Pope) To smite off, to cut off. To smite out, to knock out, as a tooth. Exod,xxi.27. To smite with the tongue, to reproach or upbarid; to revile. Origin: Smoth, rarely Smit; Smitten, rarely Smit, or Smote; Smiting] [AS. Smitan to smite, to soil, pollute; akin to OFries. Smita to smite, LG. Smiten, D. Smijten, G. Schmeissen, OHG. Smizan to smear, stroke, OSw. & dial. Sw. Smita to smite, Dan. Smiide to throw, Goth. Bismeitan, to anoint, besmear; cf. Skr. Md to be fat. The original sense seems to have been, to daub on, to smear. Cf. Smut. To strike; to collide; to beat. "The heart meleth, and the knees smite together." (Nah. Ii. 10) Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Smite Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Smite

smirkingly
smirks
smirky
smirnite
smirr
smirred
smirrier
smirriest
smirring
smirrs
smirry
smirs
smirting
smishing
smit
smite (current term)
smiter
smiters
smites
smitest
smiteth
smith
smitham
smithcraft
smithed
smither
smithereens
smitheries
smithers

Literary usage of Smite

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Englishman's Hebrew and Chaldee Concordance of the Old Testament by George V. Wigram (1866)
"For the Lord Chilli smite Israel, : 29. fir smote all the house of Jeroboam ... And ye ┬╗hail smite every fenced city, 9: 10 12 13 14 18 19 ICh II Ps, ..."

2. A Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament: Including the Biblical by Wilhelm Gesenius, Edward Robinson (1844)
"In a weaker sense, to smite as a worm a plant, to puncture Jon. ... e. to smite the hands together, eg either in exultation, to clap the hands, ..."

3. Ninety-six Sermons by Lancelot Andrewes (1853)
"[Then said Abishai to David, God hath delivered thine enemy into thine hand this day: now therefore let me smite him, I pray thee, with the spear even to ..."

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