Definition of Smack

1. Noun. A blow from a flat object (as an open hand).

Exact synonyms: Slap
Generic synonyms: Blow, Bump
Derivative terms: Slap



2. Verb. Deliver a hard blow to. "The fighter managed to smack his opponent"; "The teacher smacked the student who had misbehaved"
Exact synonyms: Thwack
Generic synonyms: Hit
Derivative terms: Smacker, Smacking, Thwack

3. Adverb. Directly. "Ran slap into her"
Exact synonyms: Bang, Bolt, Slap, Slapdash
Language type: Colloquialism

4. Noun. The taste experience when a savoury condiment is taken into the mouth.

5. Verb. Have an element suggestive (of something). "This passage smells of plagiarism"
Exact synonyms: Reek, Smell
Generic synonyms: Evoke, Paint A Picture, Suggest

6. Noun. A sailing ship (usually rigged like a sloop or cutter) used in fishing and sailing along the coast.
Generic synonyms: Sailing Ship, Sailing Vessel

7. Verb. Have a distinctive or characteristic taste. "This tastes of nutmeg"
Exact synonyms: Taste
Generic synonyms: Savor, Savour, Taste
Derivative terms: Taste, Taste, Taste, Tasting

8. Noun. Street names for heroin.
Exact synonyms: Big H, Hell Dust, Nose Drops, Scag, Skag, Thunder
Generic synonyms: Diacetylmorphine, Heroin
Language type: Street Name

9. Verb. Kiss lightly. "Sam cannot smack Sue "
Exact synonyms: Peck
Generic synonyms: Buss, Kiss, Osculate, Snog

10. Noun. An enthusiastic kiss.
Exact synonyms: Smooch
Generic synonyms: Buss, Kiss, Osculation
Specialized synonyms: Smacker
Derivative terms: Smooch

11. Verb. Press (the lips) together and open (the lips) noisily, as in eating.
Generic synonyms: Emit, Let Loose, Let Out, Utter

12. Noun. The act of smacking something; a blow delivered with an open hand.
Exact synonyms: Slap, Smacking
Specialized synonyms: Spank
Generic synonyms: Blow
Derivative terms: Slap

Definition of Smack

1. n. A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade.

2. n. Taste or flavor, esp. a slight taste or flavor; savor; tincture; as, a smack of bitter in the medicine. Also used figuratively.

3. adv. As if with a smack or slap.

4. v. i. To have a smack; to be tinctured with any particular taste.

5. v. t. To kiss with a sharp noise; to buss.

Definition of Smack

1. Noun. A distinct flavor. ¹

2. Noun. A slight trace of something; a smattering. ¹

3. Noun. (slang) heroin. ¹

4. Verb. To indicate or suggest something. ¹

5. Noun. A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade and so called a Fishing smack. ¹

6. Noun. A sharp blow; a slap. ''See also: spank.'' ¹

7. Noun. A loud kiss. ¹

8. Verb. To slap someone, or to make a smacking sound. ¹

9. Verb. To wetly separate the lips, making a noise, in expectation of a treat. ¹

10. Adverb. As if with a smack or slap ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Smack

1. to strike sharply [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Medical Definition of Smack

1. A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade. Origin: D. Smak; akin to LG. Smack, smak, Dan. Smakke, G. Schmacke, F. Semaque. 1. Taste or flavor, especially. A slight taste or flavor; savor; tincture; as, a smack of bitter in the medicine. Also used figuratively. "So quickly they have taken a smack in covetousness." (Robynson (More's Utopia)) "They felt the smack of this world." (Latimer) 2. A small quantity; a taste. 3. A loud kiss; a buss. "A clamorous smack." 4. A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip. 5. A quick, smart blow; a slap. Origin: OE. Smak, AS. Ssmc taste, savor; akin to D. Smaak, G. Geschmack, OHG. Smac; cf. Lith. Smagus pleasant. Cf. Smack. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Smack Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Smack

sly as a fox
sly fox
slyboot
slyboots
slyer
slyest
slyish
slyke
slyly
slyness
slynesses
slype
slypes
smFRET
smac 25
smack (current term)
smack-dab
smack dab
smack of
smack up
smackable
smackdown
smackdowns
smacked
smackee
smackees
smacker
smackeroo
smackeroonies
smackeroos

Literary usage of Smack

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language by Walter William Skeat (1893)
"Also Low G. smakken, to smack the lips (distinct from .... Wedgwood says oí smack that it is ' a syllable directly representing the sound made by the sudden ..."

2. Adventures in the Wilds of the United States and British American Provinces by Charles Lanman (1856)
"A WEEK IN A FISHING smack. ON a pleasant Monday morning, in other days, I started from Norwich, Connecticut, bound to New London, and from thence to any ..."

3. A Concise Etymological Dictionary of the English Language by Walter William Skeat (1893)
"smack (a), a sounding blow. (E. ?) Confused with the word above ... So also Dan. snekke (i) a snail, (a) a vessel or smack. See Snake, Sneak. Small. ..."

4. The Book of Humorous Verse by Carolyn Wells (1920)
"THE smack IN SCHOOL A DISTRICT school, not far away, Mid Berkshire's hills, one winter's day, Was humming with its wonted noise Of threescore mingled girls ..."

5. Rules and Regulations Made in Pursuance of an Act of Parliament Passed in ...by Great Britain Vice-Admiralty Courts, Great Britain Parliament by Great Britain Vice-Admiralty Courts, Great Britain Parliament (1842)
"The boat therefore put off, and rowed to the smack Speedwell, of London, Rycroft, ... That the smack put some of their own lines in their boat • they hod ..."

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