Definition of Serpentine

1. Adjective. Resembling a serpent in form. "Snaky ridges in the sand"

Exact synonyms: Snakelike, Snaky
Similar to: Curved, Curving
Derivative terms: Snake



Definition of Serpentine

1. a. Resembling a serpent; having the shape or qualities of a serpent; subtle; winding or turning one way and the other, like a moving serpent; anfractuous; meandering; sinuous; zigzag; as, serpentine braid.

2. n. A mineral or rock consisting chiefly of the hydrous silicate of magnesia. It is usually of an obscure green color, often with a spotted or mottled appearance resembling a serpent's skin. Precious, or noble, serpentine is translucent and of a rich oil-green color.

3. v. i. To serpentize.

Definition of Serpentine

1. Proper noun. Name of the lake in Hyde Park, London. ¹

2. Adjective. Sinuous; curving in alternate directions. ¹

3. Adjective. Having the shape or form of a snake. ¹

4. Adjective. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of snakes. ¹

5. Adjective. Of, or having attributes associated with, the mythological serpent, such as craftiness or deceitfulness. ¹

6. Noun. Any of several plants believed to cure snakebites. ¹

7. Noun. An early form of cannon. ¹

8. Noun. A coiled distillation tube. ¹

9. Adjective. (context: geology botany) Of or characteristic of serpentine rocks or the plants that grow there. ¹

10. Noun. (minerology) Any of several green/brown minerals consisting of a magnesium and iron silicates. ¹

11. Noun. (minerology) Any of many minerals that have the same layered crystal structure. ¹

12. Noun. (geology) An outcrop or region with soil and rock dominated by these minerals. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Serpentine

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Serpentine

1. 1. A mineral or rock consisting chiefly of the hydrous silicate of magnesia. It is usually of an obscure green colour, often with a spotted or mottled appearance resembling a serpent's skin. Precious, or noble, serpentine is translucent and of a rich oil-green colour. Serpentine has been largely produced by the alteration of other minerals, especially of chrysolite. 2. A kind of ancient cannon. Origin: Cf. (for sense 1) F. Serpentine, (for sense 2) serpentin. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Serpentine Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Serpentine

serows
serozyme
serpens
serpent
serpent-tongued
serpent-worship
serpent fern
serpent star
serpent ulcer of cornea
serpentaria
serpentarius
serpented
serpentiform
serpentigenous
serpentiginous
serpentine (current term)
serpentine aneurysm
serpentinely
serpentines
serpenting
serpentinian
serpentinite
serpentinites
serpentinization
serpentinizations
serpentinize
serpentinized
serpentinizing
serpentinous
serpentize

Literary usage of Serpentine

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"In some localities serpentine is found in masses which are evidently intrusive among ... It is noteworthy that the serpentine is frequently crushed and ..."

2. The Data of Geochemistry by Frank Wigglesworth Clarke (1908)
"TALC AND serpentine. When distinctively magnesian silicates undergo hydrous metamorphism, which happens chiefly iu the belt of weathering, the product is ..."

3. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1888)
"It \л noteworthy that the serpentine ы frequently crushed and brecciated, ... The surface of an exposed mass of serpentine ij generally barren, ..."

4. The American Geologist by Newton Horace Winchell (1888)
"H. WILLIAMS: "serpentine originates from the. change of many eruptive rocks—generally Peridotites—and it is generally possible by microscopic study to ..."

5. Elements of Chemical and Physical Geology by Gustav Bischof (1855)
"It has been shown that, in the alteration of garnet into serpentine, there is a considerable elimination of alumina. The decomposition of felspar furnishes ..."

6. Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1888)
"The many areas of serpentine of southeastern Pennsylvania are closely related, if not in most respects identical, with the serpentine which is minutely ..."

7. Chemical and Geological Essays by Thomas Sterry Hunt (1875)
"Metamorphosis of dolomite to serpentine : — This change ... Metamorphosis of diorite, hornblende-rock, and labradorite to serpentine ; G. Rose, Breithaupt, ..."

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