Definition of Reformation

1. Noun. Improvement (or an intended improvement) in the existing form or condition of institutions or practices etc.; intended to make a striking change for the better in social or political or religious affairs.

Generic synonyms: Improvement, Melioration
Specialized synonyms: Counterreformation
Derivative terms: Reform



2. Noun. A religious movement of the 16th century that began as an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church and resulted in the creation of Protestant churches.
Exact synonyms: Protestant Reformation
Generic synonyms: Religious Movement

3. Noun. Rescuing from error and returning to a rightful course. "The reclamation of delinquent children"
Exact synonyms: Reclamation
Generic synonyms: Deliverance, Delivery, Rescue, Saving
Derivative terms: Reclaim, Reform, Reform, Reform

Definition of Reformation

1. n. The act of reforming, or the state of being reformed; change from worse to better; correction or amendment of life, manners, or of anything vicious or corrupt; as, the reformation of manners; reformation of the age; reformation of abuses.

2. n. The act of forming anew; a second forming in order; as, the reformation of a column of troops into a hollow square.

Definition of Reformation

1. Proper noun. The religious movement initiated by Martin Luther in the 16th century to reform the Roman Catholic Church. ¹

2. Noun. An improvement (or an intended improvement) in the existing form or condition of institutions or practices etc.; intended to make a striking change for the better in social or political or religious affairs. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Reformation

1. formation [n -S] - See also: formation

Medical Definition of Reformation

1. 1. The act of reforming, or the state of being reformed; change from worse to better; correction or amendment of life, manners, or of anything vicious or corrupt; as, the reformation of manners; reformation of the age; reformation of abuses. "Satire lashes vice into reformation." (Dryden) 2. Specifically, the important religious movement commenced by Luther early in the sixteenth century, which resulted in the formation of the various Protestant churches. Synonym: Reform, amendment, correction, rectification. Reformation, Reform. Reformation is a more thorough and comprehensive change than reform. It is applied to subjects that are more important, and results in changes which are more lasting. A reformation involves, and is followed by, many particular reforms. "The pagan converts mention this great reformation of those who had been the greatest sinners, with that sudden and surprising change which the Christian religion made in the lives of the most profligate." . "A variety of schemes, founded in visionary and impracticable ideas of reform, were suddenly produced." . Origin: F. Reformation, L. Reformatio. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Reformation Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Reformation

reformable
reformade
reformades
reformado
reformadoes
reformados
reformalize
reformalized
reformalizes
reformalizing
reformat
reformate
reformated
reformates
reformating
reformation (current term)
reformational
reformations
reformative
reformatories
reformatory
reformats
reformattable
reformatted
reformatter
reformatters
reformatting
reformed
reformer
reformers

Literary usage of Reformation

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Annual Report by Correctional Association of New York (1870)
"Are criminals capable of reformation ? 2. If so, what are the essential bases of ... What are the special agencies to be employed in the work of reformation ..."

2. The Works of Tennyson by Alfred Tennyson Tennyson, Hallam Tennyson Tennyson (1908)
"The reception of the reformation in Brandenburg ... Thus, while the Brandenburg reformation received the Imperial sanction in 1541, Joachim II remained on ..."

3. The Cambridge Modern History by John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Acton, Ernest Alfred Benians, Sir Adolphus William Ward, George Walter Prothero (1908)
"Although therefore Joachim I, without remaining insensible to the influence of the Renaissance, held out to the best of his power against the reformation, ..."

4. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann, Edward Aloysius Pace, Condé Bénoist Pallen, Thomas Joseph Shahan, John Joseph Wynne (1913)
"Leaving no means unused by word and pen, by constant intercourse with similarly minded persons, by popular eloquence, which the leaders of the reformation ..."

5. The Christian Examiner (1844)
"THE reprint of Burnet's celebrated History of the reformation of the ... Protestants, in general, have a vague and indefinite idea of the reformation. ..."

6. The Cambridge History of English Literature by Adolphus William Ward, Alfred Rayney Waller (1909)
"CHAPTER lI reformation Literature in England THE reformation left its mark ... The question, therefore, arises how far the English reformation was either ..."

7. The Christian Examiner and Religious Miscellany by Alvan Lamson, Ezra Stiles Gannett, George Putnam, George Edward Ellis (1844)
"THE reprint of Burnet's celebrated History of the reformation of the ... Protestants, in general, have a vague and indefinite idea of the reformation. ..."

8. A Manual of the History of the Political System of Europe and Its Colonies by Arnold Hermann Ludwig Heeren (1864)
"Political view of the reformation, from its origin, 1517, to the religious peace of 1555. ... Christliche Kirchengeschichte srit der reformation, von. ..."

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