Definition of Magic

1. Noun. Any art that invokes supernatural powers.

Exact synonyms: Thaumaturgy
Generic synonyms: Supernaturalism
Specialized synonyms: Juju, Mojo, Conjuration, Conjuring, Conjury, Invocation, Black Art, Black Magic, Necromancy, Sorcery, White Magic
Derivative terms: Magical, Magician



2. Adjective. Possessing or using or characteristic of or appropriate to supernatural powers. "Wizardly powers"
Exact synonyms: Charming, Magical, Sorcerous, Witching, Wizard, Wizardly
Similar to: Supernatural
Derivative terms: Sorcery, Wizard, Wizard

3. Noun. An illusory feat; considered magical by naive observers.

Definition of Magic

1. n. A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces in nature attained by a study of occult science, including enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy, incantation, etc.

2. a. Pertaining to the hidden wisdom supposed to be possessed by the Magi; relating to the occult powers of nature, and the producing of effects by their agency.

Definition of Magic

1. Proper noun. The decrypted Japanese messages produced by US cryptographers in and prior to World War II. ¹

2. Noun. Allegedly supernatural charm, spell or other method to dominate natural forces. ¹

3. Noun. A ritual associated with supernatural magic or with mysticism. ¹

4. Noun. An illusion performed to give the appearance of magic or the supernatural. ¹

5. Noun. A cause not quite understood. ¹

6. Noun. (figuratively) Something spectacular or wonderful. ¹

7. Noun. (computing slang) Any behaviour of a program or algorithm that cannot be explained or is yet to be defined or implemented. ¹

8. Adjective. Having supernatural talents, properties or qualities attributed to magic. ¹

9. Adjective. Featuring illusions that are usually performed for entertainment. ¹

10. Adjective. Wonderful, amazing or incredible. ¹

11. Adjective. (physics) Describing the number of nucleons in a particularly stable isotopic nucleus; 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, 126, and 184 ¹

12. Adjective. (UK slang) Great; ideal. ¹

13. Verb. (transitive) To cast a magic spell on or at someone or something. ¹

14. Verb. (transitive) To produce something, as if by magic. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Magic

1. to affect by magic (sorcery) [v -ICKED, -ICKING, -ICS]

Medical Definition of Magic

1. A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces in nature attained by a study of occult science, including enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy, incantation, etc. "An appearance made by some magic." (Chaucer) Celestial magic, a supposed supernatural power which gave to spirits a kind of dominion over the planets, and to the planets an influence over men. Natural magic, the art of employing the powers of nature to produce effects apparently supernatural. Superstitious, or Geotic, magic, the invocation of devils or demons, involving the supposition of some tacit or express agreement between them and human beings. Synonym: Sorcery, witchcraft, necromancy, conjuration, enchantment. Origin: OE. Magique, L. Magice, Gr. (sc), fr. See Magic, and Magi. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Magic Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Magic Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Magic

maggotlike
maggotorium
maggotoriums
maggotries
maggotry
maggots
maggoty
maggoty-pie
maggoty-pies
maggs
maghagendorfite
maghemite
maghet
magian
magians
magic (current term)
magic-wand
magic bullet
magic bullets
magic carpet
magic carpets
magic circle
magic circles
magic cookie
magic cookies
magic cubes
magic eye
magic eyes
magic lamp
magic lamps

Literary usage of Magic

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"The Romans were too self-reliant and practical to be terrified by magic. ... In the first century of our era Oriental magic invaded the Roman Empire. ..."

2. Index to Fairy Tales, Myths and Legends by Mary Huse Eastman (1915)
"magic axe and the white cat. Mace. Home fairy tales. magic bed. ... magic feather. Compton. Snowbird and the water tiger, and other American Indian tales. ..."

3. The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge: Embracing by Johann Jakob Herzog, Philip Schaff, Albert Hauck (1910)
"Among strongly infused with magic elements Teutons which had reached a degree ... In Greece magic was an important religious factor even in the Homeric and ..."

4. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1919)
"Observe that in the case of a singly even magic square it will be necessary in constructing E to take care in the second step that in every row at least one ..."

5. The Monist by Hegeler Institute (1911)
"We are indebted to Dr. C. Planck for this interesting square which is magic in its six rows, six columns and twelve diagonals, and is also four-ply and ..."

6. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon (1854)
"But the inquisition into the crime of magic, which, under the reign of the two brothers, ,was so rigorously prosecuted both at Rome and Antioch, ..."

7. Journal of the American Oriental Society by American Oriental Society (1889)
"Other magic is of doubtful In the use of the Atharvan we may distinguish between pure and false magic, as in the use of weapons. Pure magic is where a ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Magic

Search for Magic on Dictionary.com!Search for Magic on Thesaurus.com!Search for Magic on Google!Search for Magic on Wikipedia!

Search