Definition of Leap

1. Noun. A light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwards.

Exact synonyms: Bounce, Bound, Leaping, Saltation, Spring
Generic synonyms: Jump, Jumping
Specialized synonyms: Caper, Capriole, Pounce
Derivative terms: Bound, Bound, Saltate, Spring, Spring



2. Verb. Move forward by leaps and bounds. "The horses leap across the field"; "Can you jump over the fence?"

3. Noun. An abrupt transition. "A successful leap from college to the major leagues"
Exact synonyms: Jump, Saltation
Generic synonyms: Transition
Specialized synonyms: Quantum Jump
Derivative terms: Jump

4. Verb. Pass abruptly from one state or topic to another. "Jump from one thing to another"
Exact synonyms: Jump
Generic synonyms: Change, Shift, Switch
Derivative terms: Jump

5. Noun. A sudden and decisive increase. "A jump in attendance"
Exact synonyms: Jump
Generic synonyms: Increase
Specialized synonyms: Quantum Jump, Quantum Leap
Derivative terms: Jump

6. Verb. Jump down from an elevated point. "The widow leapt into the funeral pyre"
Exact synonyms: Jump, Jump Off
Generic synonyms: Move

7. Noun. The distance leaped (or to be leaped). "A leap of 10 feet"
Generic synonyms: Distance
Specialized synonyms: Elevation

8. Verb. Cause to jump or leap. "The men leap the horses across the field"; "The trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop"
Exact synonyms: Jump
Causes: Bound, Jump, Spring

Definition of Leap

1. n. A basket.

2. v. i. To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a horse.

3. v. t. To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch.

4. n. The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound.

Definition of Leap

1. Initialism. Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol ¹

2. Verb. (intransitive) To jump from one location to another. ¹

3. Noun. The act of leaping or jumping. ¹

4. Noun. The distance traversed by a leap or jump. ¹

5. Noun. (figuratively) A significant move forward. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Leap

1. to spring off the ground [v LEAPED or LEAPT or LEPT, LEAPING, LEAPS]

Medical Definition of Leap

1. 1. To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch. 2. To copulate with (a female beast); to cover. 3. To cause to leap; as, to leap a horse across a ditch. 1. A basket. 2. A weel or wicker trap for fish. Origin: AS. Leap. 1. To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a horse. " Leap in with me into this angry flood." (Shak) 2. To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to bound; to move swiftly. Also Fig. "My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky." (Wordsworth) Origin: OE. Lepen, leapen, AS. Hleapan to leap, jump, run; akin to OS. Ahlpan, OFries. Hlapa, D. Loopen, G. Laufen, OHG. Louffan, hlauffan, Icel. Hlaupa, Sw. Lopa, Dan. Lobe, Goth. Ushlaupan. Cf. Elope, Lope, Lapwing, Loaf to loiter. 1. The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound. "Wickedness comes on by degrees, . . . And sudden leaps from one extreme to another are unnatural." (L'Estrange) "Changes of tone may proceed either by leaps or glides." (H. Sweet) 2. Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast. 3. A fault. 4. A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other and intermediate intervals. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Leap Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Leap

leaners
leanest
leaneth
leaning
leaning against
leaning board
leaningly
leanings
leanly
leanness
leannesses
leans
leant
leanwash
leany
leap (current term)
leap-of-faith
leap-year
leap day
leap days
leap frog
leap in the dark
leap of faith
leap out
leap second
leap seconds
leap to mind
leap year
leap years
leapable

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