Definition of Knarls

1. Noun. (plural of knarl) ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Knarls

1. knarl [n] - See also: knarl

Knarls Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Knarls

knapple
knappled
knapples
knappling
knappy
knaps
knapsack
knapsacked
knapsacking
knapsacks
knapweed
knapweeds
knar
knarl
knarled
knarls (current term)
knarred
knarrier
knarriest
knarring
knarry
knars
knaur
knaurs
knauvshawl
knave
knave of clubs
knave of diamonds
knave of hearts
knave of spades

Literary usage of Knarls

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley in Verse and Prose, Now First Brought by Robert Browning, W. Tyas Harden, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Harry Buxton Forman, William Groser (1880)
"WAGNER. Thou seest, a dog and no spectre is there. He knarls, and hesitating lays himself on his belly: he wags his tail—of all dogs the custom. ..."

2. The New England Magazine by Making of America Project (1886)
"Their crockery, much of it, was made of hard wood: from knarls they made trays, bowls, pans, plates, and sometimes spoons, knives, and forks. ..."

3. Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association at the Annual Meeting by American Pharmaceutical Association, National Pharmaceutical Convention (1905)
"... arms will not be lacking to drive it farther and farther home as the knuts and the knarls gradually give way. In the meantime let us realize that the ..."

4. Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association at the Annual Meeting by American Pharmaceutical Association, National Pharmaceutical Convention (1905)
"It has entered the wedge, and strong arms will not be lacking to drive it farther and farther home as the knots and the knarls gradually give way. ..."

5. The Life of General Ely S. Parker: Last Grand Sachem of the Iroquois and by Arthur Caswell Parker (1919)
"Our wooden bowls were very handsome and some were carved from knots or knarls. When we ate, two benches were put together and the bark or wood bowls of meat ..."

6. Manual of Plant Diseases by Paul Sorauer, Gustav Lindau, Ludwig Reh, Frances Dorrance (1922)
"If actual canker swellings are not concerned here, yet the phenomena may well have been meant, which we would now call knarls. Theophrastus found this kind ..."

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