Definition of Heave

1. Noun. An upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling). "The heaving of waves on a rough sea"

Exact synonyms: Heaving
Generic synonyms: Ascension, Ascent, Rise, Rising



2. Verb. Utter a sound, as with obvious effort. "She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do"
Generic synonyms: Emit, Let Loose, Let Out, Utter

3. Noun. (geology) a horizontal dislocation.
Category relationships: Geology
Generic synonyms: Motion, Movement

4. Verb. Throw with great effort.
Generic synonyms: Throw
Derivative terms: Heaving

5. Noun. The act of lifting something with great effort.
Exact synonyms: Heaving
Generic synonyms: Ascending, Ascension, Ascent, Rise

6. Verb. Rise and move, as in waves or billows. "The army surged forward"
Exact synonyms: Billow, Surge
Generic synonyms: Blow Up, Inflate
Derivative terms: Billow, Heaving, Surge

7. Noun. An involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting. "A bad case of the heaves"
Exact synonyms: Retch
Generic synonyms: Spasm
Derivative terms: Retch, Retch

8. Verb. Lift or elevate.
Exact synonyms: Heave Up, Heft, Heft Up
Specialized synonyms: Upheave, Weigh Anchor, Weigh The Anchor
Generic synonyms: Lift
Derivative terms: Heaver, Heaving

9. Noun. The act of raising something. "Fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up"
Exact synonyms: Lift, Raise
Generic synonyms: Actuation, Propulsion
Derivative terms: Lift, Lift, Lift, Raise, Raise

10. Verb. Move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position. "The vessel hove into sight"
Generic synonyms: Move

11. Noun. Throwing something heavy (with great effort). "He was not good at heaving passes"
Exact synonyms: Heaving
Generic synonyms: Throw

12. Verb. Breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted. "The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily"
Exact synonyms: Gasp, Pant, Puff
Generic synonyms: Blow
Derivative terms: Gasp, Heaving, Pant, Panting, Puff, Puffing

13. Verb. Bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat. "The highway buckled during the heat wave"
Exact synonyms: Buckle, Warp
Generic synonyms: Change Surface
Specialized synonyms: Lift
Derivative terms: Buckle, Warp

14. Verb. Make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit.
Exact synonyms: Gag, Retch
Derivative terms: Retch

Definition of Heave

1. v. t. To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; -- often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land.

2. v. i. To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.

3. n. An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy.

Definition of Heave

1. Verb. (transitive archaic) To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards. ¹

2. Verb. (transitive) To lift with difficulty; to raise with some effort; to lift (a heavy thing). ¹

3. Verb. (transitive mining geology) To displace (a vein, stratum). ¹

4. Verb. (transitive now rare) To cause to swell or rise, especially in repeated exertions. ¹

5. Verb. (intransitive) To rise and fall. ¹

6. Verb. (transitive) To utter with effort. ¹

7. Verb. (transitive now nautical) To throw, cast. ¹

8. Verb. (transitive nautical) To pull up with a rope or cable. ¹

9. Verb. (intransitive nautical) To move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation. ¹

10. Verb. (intransitive) To make an effort to vomit; to retch. ¹

11. Noun. An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy. ¹

12. Noun. An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like. ¹

13. Noun. A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode. ¹

14. Noun. (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel goes up and down in a short period of time. Compare with pitch. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Heave

1. to lift forcefully [v HEAVED, HOVE, HEAVING, HEAVES]

Medical Definition of Heave

1. 1. To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land. Heave, as now used, implies that the thing raised is heavy or hard to move; but formerly it was used in a less restricted sense. 2. To throw; to cast; obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log. 3. To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead. 4. To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh. 5. To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom. To heave a cable short, to raise it from the bottom of the sea or elsewhere. 2. To rise and fall with alternate motions, as the lungs in heavy breathing, as waves in a heavy sea, as ships on the billows, as the earth when broken up by frost, etc.; to swell; to dilate; to expand; to distend; hence, to labour; to struggle. "Frequent for breath his panting bosom heaves." (Prior) "The heaving plain of ocean." (Byron) 3. To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult. 4. To make an effort to vomit; to retch; to vomit. To heave at. To make an effort at. To attack, to oppose. To heave in sight (as a ship at sea), to come in sight; to appear. To heave up, to vomit. 2. An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like. 3. A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode. Origin: OE. Heven, hebben, As. Hebban; akin to OS. Hebbian, D. Heffen, OHG. Heffan, hevan, G. Heven, Icel. Hafva, Dan. Haeve, Goth. Hafjan, L. Capere to take, seize; cf. Gr. Handle. Cf. Accept, Behoof, Capacious, Forceps, haft, Receipt. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Heave Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Heave

heatsink
heatsinks
heatspot
heatspots
heatstroke
heatstrokes
heatwave
heatwaves
heauen
heauenly
heauens
heaume
heaumes
heav'n
heav'nly
heave (current term)
heave-ho
heave-to
heave up
heaved
heaven
heaven-sent
heaven forbid
heaven forfend
heaven helps those who help themselves
heaven knows
heaven on a stick
heaven tree
heavenes
heavenful

Literary usage of Heave

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Permafrost: Second International Conference, July 13-28, 1973 : USSR by Frederick J. Sanger, Peter J. Hyde (1978)
"From the point of view of the physics of surface phenomena promoting recognition of soil heave theory, the interaction of these factors forms the force ..."

2. The Sacred Books and Early Literature of the East, with Historical Surveys by Charles F Horne (1917)
"The heave-offering of the Lord, and the heave-offering of the tithes, and of the dough, ... The heave-offering of Midian was for Eleazar the priest, ..."

3. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria by Royal Society of Victoria (Melbourne, Vic.), Royal Society of Victoria (1903)
"The following table gives approximately the amount of the heave due to the vertical displacement and the amount of the observed heave, and the amount of ..."

4. Poems by John Nelson M'Jilton (1840)
"YO heave! OH, that I were a sailor boy,— How happy should I be! ... Some proud exploit I'd soon achieve, And long and loud I'd sing—yo heave! ..."

5. The New Englander by William Lathrop Kingsley (1873)
"heave Ho I With but one word. Yo Ho! heave Ho! Our God and Lord Yo Ho I heave Ho ! On earth was born; Yo Ho! heave Ho I By us adored, Yo Ho I heave Ho I In ..."

6. New Englander and Yale Review by Edward Royall Tyler, William Lathrop Kingsley, George Park Fisher, Timothy Dwight (1873)
"Created man Yo Ho I heave Ho I With but one word. Yo Ho! heave Ho I Our God and Lord Yo Ho! heave Ho! On earth was born; ..."

7. The Writings in Prose and Verse of Rudyard Kipling by Rudyard Kipling (1899)
"heave, ah heave her short again! Over, snatch her over, there, and hold her on the pawl. Loose all sail, and brace your yards back and full— Ready jib to ..."

8. Dictionary of National Biography by LESLIE. STEPHEN (1887)
"•quale attack on the part of the British force following up the effect of the explosion vessels, the stranded ships were permitted to heave off and thus ..."

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