Definition of Harlequin-snake

1. Noun. Any of several venomous New World snakes brilliantly banded in red and black and either yellow or white; widely distributed in South America and Central America.




Harlequin-snake Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Harlequin-snake

harken
harken back
harkened
harkener
harkeners
harkening
harkens
harkerite
harking
harks
harl
harle
harlech group
harled
harlequin
harlequin-snake (current term)
harlequin chromosome
harlequin duck
harlequin ducks
harlequin eye
harlequin ichthyosis
harlequin opal
harlequin reaction
harlequinade
harlequinades
harlequined
harlequinesque
harlequining
harlequins

Literary usage of Harlequin-snake

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. College zoology by Robert William Hegner (1918)
"The harlequin snake of the southeastern United States averages about two and a half ... The harlequin snake burrows in the ground, and feeds chiefly upon ..."

2. The Reptile Book: A Comprehensive, Popularised Work on the Structure and by Raymond Lee Ditmars (1907)
"Snout black; a broad yellow band across centre of head and behind this a black ring. Yellow rings of body very narrow. HARLEQUIN SNAKE; CORAL SNAKE, ..."

3. First Course in Biology by Liberty Hyde Bailey, Walter Moore Coleman (1908)
"280). coral snake is said to mimic the harlequin snake. It also imitates the quiet inoffensive habits of the harlequin snake, which fortunately does not ..."

4. Civic Biology: Textbook of Problems, Local and National, that Can be Solved by Clifton Fremont Hodge, Jean Dawson (1918)
"The two species are the harlequin snake (Elaps ... Coral, or harlequin, snake, with yellow band around head and also between the red and black bands of the ..."

5. The New International Encyclopædia edited by Daniel Coit Gilman, Harry Thurston Peck, Frank Moore Colby (1903)
"Several other sorts of birds have been called 'harlequins' because of their quaintly contrasted colors. harlequin-snake (so called from the coloring). ..."

6. Anomalies and curiosities of medicine by George Milbry Gould, Walter Lytle Pyle (1901)
"... the third is the Ancistrodon, or moo- »-.isin. one of the species of which is a water-snake ; and the fourth is the Elaps, or harlequin snake. ..."

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