Definition of Fleet

1. Noun. Group of aircraft operating together under the same ownership.

Member holonyms: Aircraft
Group relationships: Airline, Airline Business, Airway
Generic synonyms: Accumulation, Aggregation, Assemblage, Collection



2. Verb. Move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart. "The streets fleet with crowds"; "The hummingbird flitted among the branches"
Exact synonyms: Dart, Flit, Flutter
Specialized synonyms: Butterfly
Generic synonyms: Hurry, Speed, Travel Rapidly, Zip
Derivative terms: Dart, Flit, Flutter

3. Adjective. Moving very fast. "A swift runner"
Exact synonyms: Swift
Similar to: Fast
Derivative terms: Fleetness, Swiftness

4. Noun. Group of motor vehicles operating together under the same ownership.
Member holonyms: Autobus, Bus, Charabanc, Coach, Double-decker, Jitney, Motorbus, Motorcoach, Omnibus, Passenger Vehicle, Cab, Hack, Taxi, Taxicab
Group relationships: Bus Line
Generic synonyms: Accumulation, Aggregation, Assemblage, Collection
Specialized synonyms: Motor Pool

5. Verb. Disappear gradually. "The pain eventually passed off"
Exact synonyms: Blow Over, Evanesce, Fade, Pass, Pass Off
Generic synonyms: Disappear, Go Away, Vanish
Derivative terms: Evanescence, Evanescent, Passing

6. Noun. A group of steamships operating together under the same ownership.
Member holonyms: Ship
Generic synonyms: Steamship Company, Steamship Line
Specialized synonyms: Argosy

7. Noun. A group of warships organized as a tactical unit.

Definition of Fleet

1. v. i. To sail; to float.

2. v. t. To pass over rapidly; to skin the surface of; as, a ship that fleets the gulf.

3. a. Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and quick in going from place to place; nimble.

4. n. A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.

5. n. A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- obsolete, except as a place name, -- as Fleet Street in London.

6. v. t. To take the cream from; to skim.

7. v. i. To move or change in position; -- said of persons; as, the crew fleeted aft.

8. v. t. To move or change in position; used only in special phrases; as, of fleet aft the crew.

Definition of Fleet

1. Proper noun. The stream that ran where Fleet Street now runs. ¹

2. Proper noun. A former prison in London, which originally stood near the stream. ¹

3. Noun. A group of vessels or vehicles. ¹

4. Noun. (nautical) A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc. ¹

5. Noun. (context: nautical British Royal Navy) Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in size, or a rear-admiral's command, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels. ¹

6. Noun. (context: nautical obsolete) A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river subject to the tide. ¹

7. Noun. (nautical) A location, as on a navigable river, where barges are secured. ¹

8. Verb. (obsolete) To float. ¹

9. Verb. To pass over rapidly; to skim the surface of ¹

10. Verb. To hasten over; to cause to pass away lightly, or in mirth and joy ¹

11. Verb. (nautical) To move up a rope, so as to haul to more advantage; especially to draw apart the blocks of a tackle. ¹

12. Verb. (context: nautical obsolete) To shift the position of dead-eyes when the shrouds are become too long. ¹

13. Verb. To cause to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain. ¹

14. Verb. To take the cream from; to skim. ¹

15. Adjective. (literary) Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and quick in going from place to place; nimble; fast. ¹

16. Adjective. (uncommon) Light; superficially thin; not penetrating deep, as soil. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Fleet

1. swift [adj FLEETER, FLEETEST] : FLEETLY [adv] / to move swiftly [v -ED, -ING, -S] - See also: swift

Medical Definition of Fleet

1. 1. A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; obsolete, except as a place name, as Fleet Street in London. "Together wove we nets to entrap the fish In floods and sedgy fleets." (Matthewes) 2. A former prison in London, which originally stood near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up). Fleet parson, a clergyman of low character, in, or in the vicinity of, the Fleet prison, who was ready to unite persons in marriage (called Fleet marriage) at any hour, without public notice, witnesses, or consent of parents. Origin: AS. Fleot a place where vessels float, bay, river; akin to D. Vliet rill, brook, G. Fliess. See Fleet. 1. To pass over rapidly; to skin the surface of; as, a ship that fleets the gulf. 2. To hasten over; to cause to pass away lighty, or in mirth and joy. "Many young gentlemen flock to him, and fleet the time carelessly." (Shak) 3. To draw apart the blocks of; said of a tackle. To cause to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain. 1. To sail; to float. "And in frail wood on Adrian Gulf doth fleet." (Spenser) 2. To fly swiftly; to pass over quickly; to hasten; to flit as a light substance. "All the unaccomplished works of Nature's hand, . . . Dissolved on earth, fleet hither." (Milton) 3. To slip on the whelps or the barrel of a capstan or windlass; said of a cable or hawser. Origin: OE. Fleten, fleoten, to swim, AS. Fleotan to swim, float; akin to D. Vlieten to flow, OS. Fliotan, OHG. Fliozzan, G. Fliessen, Icel. Fljota to float, flow, Sw. Flyta, D. Flyde, L. Pluere to rain, Gr. To sail, swim, float, Skr. Plu to swim, sail. Cf. Fleet, &, Float, Pluvial, Flow. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Fleet Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Fleet Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Fleet

fleecily
fleeciness
fleecing
fleecy
fleed
fleeing
fleer
fleered
fleerer
fleerers
fleering
fleeringly
fleerings
fleers
flees
fleet (current term)
fleet admiral
fleet ballistic missile submarine
fleet captain
fleet captains
fleet in being
fleet landing
fleete
fleeted
fleeten
fleeter
fleetes
fleetest
fleetfooted
fleeth

Literary usage of Fleet

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Who's who by Henry Robert Addison, Charles Henry Oakes, William John Lawson, Douglas Brooke Wheelton Sladen (1898)
"190 fleet Street, It.C. 186 fleet Street, It.C. . 174 fleet ... 61 fleet Street, EC 150 fleet Street, EC 47 fleet Street, EC 74 fleet Street, EC 49 fleet ..."

2. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann, Edward Aloysius Pace, Condé Bénoist Pallen, Thomas Joseph Shahan, John Joseph Wynne (1913)
"De Grasse kept the English fleet engaged for five days, and then returning found De Barras ... On 8 April, 1782, the fleet under De Grasse was attacked ..."

3. The Cambridge Modern History by John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Acton, Ernest Alfred Benians, Sir Adolphus William Ward, George Walter Prothero (1909)
"But the Russian fleet actually appeared in the Baltic without any English fleet being ... Even if not a " formidable " fleet, they might at least send him a ..."

4. The History of Rome by Wilhelm Ihne (1871)
"The build- The narrative of the building of the first Roman fleet is fl«.t° tie ... The decision of the Roman senate to build a fleet was not carried out, ..."

5. Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature by H.W. Wilson Company (1908)
"Beautiful sea spectacle; Argentine squadron and the fleet. Outlook. ... Work and play of the fleet. R. Dunn. 11. Harp. run of the battleship fleet. R. Dunn. ..."

6. The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon (1899)
"The proud galleys, which in formel ages swept the Mediterranean with so many hundred oars, had long since disappeared ; and the fleet of Justinian was ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Fleet

Search for Fleet on Dictionary.com!Search for Fleet on Thesaurus.com!Search for Fleet on Google!Search for Fleet on Wikipedia!

Search

Translations