Definition of Feeze

1. v. t. To turn, as a screw.



2. n. Fretful excitement. [Obs.] See Feaze.

Definition of Feeze

1. Noun. (obsolete) fretful excitement ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Feeze

1. to faze [v FEEZED, FEEZING, FEEZES] - See also: faze

Feeze Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Feeze

fees
fees and charges
feese
feesed
feeses
feesing
feet
feet-first
feet first
feet of clay
feet on the ground
feetfirst
feetless
feetlong
feets
feeze (current term)
feezed
feezes
feezing
fefnicute
feg
fegaries
fegary
fegs
feh
fehling
fehm
fehme
fehmic
fehs

Literary usage of Feeze

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Dictionary of Americanisms: A Glossary of Words and Phrases Usually Regarded by John Russell Bartlett (1877)
"Some years ago, we remember, New York was in its annual feeze about mad dogs, and the public ... When a man 's in a feeze, there's no more sleep that hitch. ..."

2. Jamieson's Dictionary of the Scottish Language: In which the Words are by John Jamieson, John Johnstone (1867)
"Transferred to the night on which this custom Is observed, 8, To feeze, ... To feeze into. " To insinuate into unmerited confidence or favour." Surv. ..."

3. An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language ...: To which is by John Jamieson (1880)
"To feeze on, to screw, S. 5. To feeze up, metaph. to flatter; also; to work up to a passion, S. 6. The word also signifies " to insinuate into unmerited ..."

4. A Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words: Especially from the Dramatists by Walter William Skeat, Anthony Lawson Mayhew (1914)
"The threat ' I'll feeze you' seems to have given rise to the sense. To ' do for', ' settle the business of, also, to beat, flog. Beaumont and Fl., Coxcomb, ..."

5. Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage by Inc. Merriam-Webster (1994)
"Our last feeze is from 1947: That didn't feeze the gaunt Kaltenbrunner —Victor H. Burnstein, Final Judgment, ..."

6. Notes on English Etymology: Chiefly Reprinted from the Transactions of the by Walter William Skeat (1901)
"Ogilvie separates the two, but refers Shakespeare's feeze to F. fesser, ... Thus the original meaning of feeze, as a transitive verb, is to cause to be ..."

7. The Gaelic Etymology of the Languages of Western Europe and More Especially by Charles Mackay (1877)
"... or feeze.—Nares doubts the origin of these words, but thinks they mean to ... and " feeze/' in Shakspeare and Ben Jonson, without any obscuration of the ..."

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