Definition of Family capparidaceae

1. Noun. A dilleniid dicot family of the order Rhoeadales that includes: genera Capparis, Cleome, Crateva, and Polanisia.




Family Capparidaceae Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Family Capparidaceae

family Caesalpiniaceae
family Callionymidae
family Calliphoridae
family Callithricidae
family Callitrichaceae
family Calostomataceae
family Calycanthaceae
family Camelidae
family Campanulaceae
family Cancridae
family Canellaceae
family Canidae
family Cannabidaceae
family Cannaceae
family Capitonidae
family Capparidaceae
family Caprifoliaceae
family Caprimulgidae
family Caproidae
family Capromyidae
family Capsidae
family Carabidae
family Carangidae
family Carapidae
family Carcharhinidae
family Carchariidae
family Cardiidae
family Cariamidae
family Caricaceae
family Carpinaceae

Literary usage of Family capparidaceae

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Plant World by Plant World Association, Wild Flower Preservation Society (U.S.) (1901)
"family capparidaceae. Caper Family. Contains about 85 genera and 400 species, natives chiefly of warm regions, and comprising both herbs and shrubs. ..."

2. Entomological News and Proceedings of the Entomological Section of the by Entomological Section (1901)
"... living upon Cleome semi/aia (family Capparidaceae). As the food-plant was a new one I requested him to rear the butterflies, so that we might be sure of ..."

3. Contributions from the United States National Herbarium by United States. National Herbarium, United States National Museum (1905)
"family capparidaceae; an annual thorny herb, 1 meter high: thrives in a dry soil. Specimens were obtained at Coamo Springs (no. 720), where the name “aromo” ..."

4. Economic plants of Porto Rico by Orator Fuller Cook, Guy N. Collins (1903)
"family capparidaceae; an annual thorny herb, 1 meter high; thrives in a dry soil. Specimens were obtained at Coamo Springs (no. 720), where the name "aromo" ..."

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