Definition of Faculty

1. Noun. One of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind.




2. Noun. The body of teachers and administrators at a school. "The dean addressed the letter to the entire staff of the university"
Exact synonyms: Staff
Generic synonyms: Body
Group relationships: School
Member holonyms: Prof, Professor
Derivative terms: Staff, Staff

Definition of Faculty

1. n. Ability to act or perform, whether inborn or cultivated; capacity for any natural function; especially, an original mental power or capacity for any of the well-known classes of mental activity; psychical or soul capacity; capacity for any of the leading kinds of soul activity, as knowledge, feeling, volition; intellectual endowment or gift; power; as, faculties of the mind or the soul.

Definition of Faculty

1. Noun. The scholarly staff at colleges or universities, as opposed to the students or support staff. ¹

2. Noun. A division of a university (e.g. a Faculty of Science or Faculty of Medicine). ¹

3. Noun. An ability, skill, or power. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Faculty

1. an inherent power or ability [n -TIES]

Medical Definition of Faculty

1. Origin: F. Facult, L. Facultas, fr. Facilis easy (cf. Facul easily), fr. Fecere to make. See Fact, and cf. Facility. 1. Ability to act or perform, whether inborn or cultivated; capacity for any natural function; especially, an original mental power or capacity for any of the well-known classes of mental activity; psychical or soul capacity; capacity for any of the leading kinds of soul activity, as knowledge, feeling, volition; intellectual endowment or gift; power; as, faculties of the mind or the soul. "But know that in the soul Are many lesser faculties that serve Reason as chief." (Milton) "What a piece of work is a man ! how noble in reason ! how infinite in faculty !" (Shak) 2. Special mental endowment; characteristic knack. "He had a ready faculty, indeed, of escaping from any topic that agitated his too sensitive and nervous temperament." (Hawthorne) 3. Power; prerogative or attribute of office. "This Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek." (Shak) 4. Privilege or permission, granted by favor or indulgence, to do a particular thing; authority; license; dispensation. "The pope . . . Granted him a faculty to set him free from his promise." (Fuller) "It had not only faculty to inspect all bishops' dioceses, but to change what laws and statutes they should think fit to alter among the colleges." (Evelyn) 5. A body of a men to whom any specific right or privilege is granted; formerly, the graduates in any of the four departments of a university or college (Philosophy, Law, Medicine, or Theology), to whom was granted the right of teaching (profitendi or docendi) in the department in which they had studied; at present, the members of a profession itself; as, the medical faculty; the legal faculty, ect. 6. The body of person to whom are intrusted the government and instruction of a college or university, or of one of its departments; the president, professors, and tutors in a college. Dean of faculty. See Dean. Faculty of advocates. See Advocate. Synonym: Talent, gift, endowment, dexterity, expertness, cleverness, readiness, ability, knack. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Faculty Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Faculty

facular
facultative
facultative aerobe
facultative anaerobe
facultative biped
facultative bipeds
facultative heterochromatin
facultative hyperopia
facultative parasite
facultative ponds
facultative quadruped
facultative quadrupeds
facultative species
facultatively
faculties
faculty (current term)
faculty member
facund
facundious
facundity
fad
fad diet
fadable
fadaise
fadaises
faddier
faddiest
faddily
faddish
faddishly

Literary usage of Faculty

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Critique of Pure Reason by Immanuel Kant (1901)
"INTRODUCTION OF THE TRANSCENDENTAL faculty OF JUDGMENT IN GENERAL If understanding in ... This faculty is therefore the specific quality of the so-called ..."

2. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"The faculty of medicine would seem to be the last in point of time. ... The four nations constituted the faculty of arts or letters. The expression faculty ..."

3. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1896)
"Ducros, of the faculty of Letters, and M. Carbonel, Secretary of the faculty of ... Bouchard, of the faculty of Medicine ; Prof. Gayen, of the faculty of ..."

4. The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle by Aristotle (1891)
"A quality of the soul is either (1) a passion or emotion, or (2) a power or faculty, or (3) a habit or trained faculty; and so virtue must be one of these ..."

5. The Phi Delta Kappan by Phi Delta Kappa (1916)
"I had assumed that the status of faculty members was determined by the ... My idea of what part the faculty ought to play in the affairs of the local ..."

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