Definition of Fact mood

1. Noun. A mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact.

Exact synonyms: Common Mood, Declarative, Declarative Mood, Indicative, Indicative Mood
Generic synonyms: Modality, Mode, Mood
Derivative terms: Declarative



Fact Mood Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Fact Mood Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Fact Mood

facsimileing
facsimiles
facsimiling
fact
fact-check
fact-checked
fact-checking
fact-checks
fact-finder
fact-finding
fact check
fact checked
fact checking
fact checks
fact is
fact mood (current term)
fact of life
fact sheet
factbook
factbooks
factette
factettes
factfinder
factfinders
factfinding
factful
factice
factices
facticities
facticity

Literary usage of Fact mood

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A New English Grammar, Logical and Historical by Henry Sweet (1900)
"When there are only two moods in a language to express statements, a fact-mood and a thought-mood, as is the case in Latin, French, German, and Old English, ..."

2. Grammar and Thinking: A Study of the Working Conceptions in Syntax by Alfred Dwight Sheffield (1912)
"No consistent scheme of fact-mood and thought- mood, however, is actually carried out. Here as elsewhere in language, the working of analogy was bound to ..."

3. A Review of English Grammar: For Secondary Schools by Edward Archibald Allen (1909)
"We have seen also that mood has nothing to do with fact. Mood is the tone of affirmation, the manner in which a verb says something of its subject, ..."

4. The Public School Latin Grammar for the Use of Schools, Colleges, and by Benjamin Hall Kennedy (1890)
"Mood The Indicative is the Fact-Mood, used to declare (state categorically) : scribo, I-write ; scribam, I will write, &c. Such declaration may be 1) ..."

5. A New English Grammar, Logical and Historical: By Henry Sweet by Henry Sweet (1900)
"When there are only two moods in a language to express statements, a fact-mood and a thought-mood, as is the case in Latin, French, German, and Old English, ..."

6. A Grammar of the English Language by Edward Archibald Allen, William John Hawkins (1903)
"We have seen also that mood has nothing to do -with fact. Mood is the tone of affirmation, the manner in which a verb says something of its subject, ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Fact mood

Search for Fact mood on Dictionary.com!Search for Fact mood on Thesaurus.com!Search for Fact mood on Google!Search for Fact mood on Wikipedia!

Search