Definition of Excamb

1. v. t. To exchange; -- used with reference to transfers of land.



Definition of Excamb

1. to exchange [v -ED, -ING, -S] - See also: exchange

Excamb Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Excamb

exaugurations
exauthorate
exauthorated
exauthoration
exauthorize
exauthorized
exauthorizes
exauthorizing
exbi-
exbibyte
exbibytes
exbivirumab
exboyfriend
excalation
excalceation
excamb (current term)
excambed
excambing
excambs
excandescence
excandescent
excantation
excantations
excarnate
excarnated
excarnates
excarnating
excarnation
excarnations
excarnificate

Literary usage of Excamb

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Digest of Cases Decided in the Supreme Courts of Scotland, from 1800 to 1842; by Patrick Shaw (1864)
"After a petition for authority to excamb part of an entailed estate had been ... In a petition by an heir of entail for leave to excamb, it was found that ..."

2. Reports of Cases Decided in the Court of Session, Teind Court, Court of by Robert Stuart, Scotland Court of Session, Scotland, James S. Milne, Court of Session, William Peddie (1852)
"Where a petition for authority to excamb lands had been duly intimated to the three next heirs of entail, but one of the heirs had died before the procedure ..."

3. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"Sovereigns, too, were allowed to excamb parts of the royal domain, although, ... The power to excamb was gradually conferred on entailed proprietors. ..."

4. A Treatise on the Deed of Entail: Embracing, Commentaries on the Amendment by Alexander Duff (1848)
"... Heir of entail under existing entail may excamb, with certain consents. V. That it shall be lawful for any heir of entail, being of full age, ..."

5. Cases Decided in the House of Lords: On Appeal from the Courts of Scotland by Great Britain Parliament. House of Lords, Sydney Smith Bell (1849)
"In regard to these new lands, should the heir exercising the power to sell or excamb be in debt at the time, and perform the condition in its terms by ..."

6. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1888)
"The power to excamb was gradually conferred on entailed proprietors. The Montgomery Act, which was passed in 1770, to facilitate agricultural improvements, ..."

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