Definition of Engross

1. Verb. Devote (oneself) fully to. "He immersed himself into his studies"

Exact synonyms: Absorb, Engulf, Immerse, Plunge, Soak Up, Steep
Related verbs: Immerse, Plunge
Generic synonyms: Center, Centre, Concentrate, Focus, Pore, Rivet
Specialized synonyms: Drink, Drink In
Derivative terms: Absorption, Engrossment, Engrossment, Engrossment, Immersion



2. Verb. Consume all of one's attention or time. "They engross themselves"; "Her interest in butterflies absorbs her completely"
Exact synonyms: Absorb, Engage, Occupy
Specialized synonyms: Involve, Consume, Rivet
Generic synonyms: Interest
Derivative terms: Absorption, Engrossment, Engrossment, Engrossment, Occupation, Occupation

Definition of Engross

1. v. t. To make gross, thick, or large; to thicken; to increase in bulk or quantity.

Definition of Engross

1. Verb. (transitive now legal) To write (a document) in large, aesthetic, and legible lettering; to make a finalized copy of. ¹

2. Verb. (transitive business obsolete) To buy up wholesale, especially to buy the whole supply of (a commodity etc.). ¹

3. Verb. (transitive) To monopolize; to concentrate (something) in the single possession of someone, especially unfairly. ¹

4. Verb. (transitive) To completely engage the attention of. ¹

5. Verb. (transitive, obsolete) To thicken; to condense. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Engross

1. to occupy completely [v -ED, -ING, -ES]

Medical Definition of Engross

1. 1. To make gross, thick, or large; to thicken; to increase in bulk or quantity. "Waves . . . Engrossed with mud." (Spenser) "Not sleeping, to engross his idle body." (Shak) 2. To amass. "To engross up glorious deeds on my behalf." (Shak) 3. To copy or write in a large hand (en gross, i. E, in large); to write a fair copy of in distinct and legible characters; as, to engross a deed or like instrument on parchment. "Some period long past, when clerks engrossed their stiff and formal chirography on more substantial materials." (Hawthorne) "Laws that may be engrossed on a finger nail." (De Quincey) 4. To seize in the gross; to take the whole of; to occupy wholly; to absorb; as, the subject engrossed all his thoughts. 5. To purchase either the whole or large quantities of, for the purpose of enhancing the price and making a profit; hence, to take or assume in undue quantity, proportion, or degree; as, to engross commodities in market; to engross power. Engrossed bill, a fair, round style of writing suitable for engrossing legal documents, legislative bills, etc. Synonym: To absorb, swallow up, imbibe, consume, exhaust, occupy, forestall, monopolize. See Absorb. Origin: F, fr. Pref. En- (L. In) + gros gross, grosse, n, an engrossed document: cf. OF. Engrossir, engroissier, to make thick, large, or gross. See Gross. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Engross Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Engross

engravest
engraveth
engraving
engravings
engreaten
engreatened
engreatening
engreatens
engrieve
engrieved
engrieves
engrieving
engroove
engrooved
engrooves
engross (current term)
engross'd
engrossed
engrosser
engrossers
engrosses
engrossest
engrosseth
engrossing
engrossingly
engrossment
engrossments
engs
enguard
enguarded

Literary usage of Engross

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Rural Rides in the Counties of Surrey, Kent, Sussex, Hants, Berks, Oxford by William Cobbett (1908)
"That Gentleman and Mr. Webb Hall may monopolize all the wisdom in matters of political economy; but are they, or rather is Mr. Ellman alone, to engross all ..."

2. The Life of William Wilberforce by Robert Isaac Wilberforce, Samuel Wilberforce (1838)
"My letters still almost engross me. True, they are important letters—keeping up connexion with constituents in absence from the county; also some religious ..."

3. Roman Law in the Modern World by Charles Phineas Sherman (1922)
"... of the historic jus civile alone §35 Expulsion of the Tarquin dynasty; class struggles of the patricians and plebeians soon engross the young Republic. ..."

4. The Church History of Britain: From the Birth of Jesus Christ Until the Year by Thomas Fuller (1837)
"Clergymen engross all Offices : several Opinions of the Causes thereof. It was now generally complained of as a grand grievance, that the clergy engrossed ..."

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