Definition of Deportment

1. Noun. (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people.




Definition of Deportment

1. n. Manner of deporting or demeaning one's self; manner of acting; conduct; carriage; especially, manner of acting with respect to the courtesies and duties of life; behavior; demeanor; bearing.

Definition of Deportment

1. Noun. bearing; manner of presenting oneself: ¹

2. Noun. conduct; public behavior: ¹

3. Noun. apparent level of schooling or training: ¹

4. Noun. self-discipline: ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Deportment

1. [n -S]

Deportment Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Deportment

depopulation
depopulations
depopulative
depopulator
depopulators
deport
deportable
deportation
deportations
deported
deportee
deportees
deporter
deporters
deporting
deportment (current term)
deportments
deports
deporture
deposable
deposal
deposals
depose
deposed
deposer
deposers
deposes
deposing
deposit
deposit account

Literary usage of Deportment

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The American Democrat, Or, Hints on the Social and Civic Relations of the by James Fenimore Cooper (1838)
"ON AMERICAN deportment. The American people are superior in deportment, in several particulars, to the people of Europe, and inferior in others. ..."

2. The American Democrat, Or, Hints on the Social and Civic Relations of the by James Fenimore Cooper (1838)
"A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, ... The American people are superior in deportment, in several particulars, ..."

3. Manual of Qualitative Chemical Analysis by C. Remigius Fresenius (1897)
"REACTIONS, OR deportment OF BODIES WITH REAGENTS. § 91. IN my introductory remarks, I stated that the operations and experiments of qualitative analysis ..."

4. Ethics: An Investigation of the Facts and Laws of the Moral Life by Wilhelm Max Wundt (1897)
"form part of 'polite manners' in this wider sense of the phrase; so that we can divide the topic under the two heads of personal deportment and behaviour to ..."

5. The Library of Literary Criticism of English and American Authors by Charles Wells Moulton (1904)
"heretofore had, and resumed the simpler habits and deportment of his early New England breeding. Not but what you discover, nevertheless, that he is a man ..."

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