Definition of Deceive

1. Verb. Be false to; be dishonest with.




2. Verb. Cause someone to believe an untruth. "The insurance company deceived me when they told me they were covering my house"

Definition of Deceive

1. v. t. To lead into error; to cause to believe what is false, or disbelieve what is true; to impose upon; to mislead; to cheat; to disappoint; to delude; to insnare.

Definition of Deceive

1. Verb. To trick or mislead. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Deceive

1. to mislead by falsehood [v -CEIVED, -CEIVING, -CEIVES]

Medical Definition of Deceive

1. 1. To lead into error; to cause to believe what is false, or disbelieve what is true; to impose upon; to mislead; to cheat; to disappoint; to delude; to insnare. "Evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse, deceiving, and being deceived." (2 Tim. Iii. 13) "Nimble jugglers that deceive the eye." (Shak) "What can 'scape the eye Of God all-seeing, or deceive his heart?" (Milton) 2. To beguile; to amuse, so as to divert the attention; to while away; to take away as if by deception. "These occupations oftentimes deceived The listless hour." (Wordsworth) 3. To deprive by fraud or stealth; to defraud. "Plant fruit trees in large borders, and set therein fine flowers, but thin and sparingly, lest they deceive the trees." (Bacon) Synonym: Deceive, Delude, Mislead. Deceive is a general word applicable to any kind of misrepresentation affecting faith or life. To delude, primarily, is to make sport of, by deceiving, and is accomplished by playing upon one's imagination or credulity, as by exciting false hopes, causing him to undertake or expect what is impracticable, and making his failure ridiculous. It implies some infirmity of judgment in the victim, and intention to deceive in the deluder. But it is often used reflexively, indicating that a person's own weakness has made him the sport of others or of fortune; as, he deluded himself with a belief that luck would always favor him. To mislead is to lead, guide, or direct in a wrong way, either willfully or ignorantly. Origin: OE. Deceveir, F. Decevoir, fr. L. Decipere to catch, insnare, deceive; de- + capere to take, catch. See Capable, and cf. Deceit, Deception. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Deceive Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Deceive

deceasing
decedent
decedents
deceit
deceitful
deceitfull
deceitfully
deceitfulness
deceitfulnesses
deceitless
deceits
deceiv'd
deceivable
deceivableness
deceivably
deceive (current term)
deceived
deceiver
deceivers
deceives
deceivest
deceiveth
deceiving
deceivingly
decelerate
decelerated
decelerates
decelerating
deceleration
decelerations

Literary usage of Deceive

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. An exposition of the Creed by John Pearson, Edward Burton (1857)
"But it is impossible for any one to lie, who can neither deceive nor be deceived. Therefore it is a manifest contradiction to say that God can lie, ..."

2. Supreme Court Reporter by Robert Desty, United States Supreme Court, West Publishing Company (1907)
"... falsely, • and fraudulently, with the* purpose to mislead and deceive the company, misrepresented in the application any matter concerning bis health, ..."

3. Principles of the English Law of Contract and of Agency in Its Relation to by William Reynell Anson (1895)
"Deceit The representation must actually deceive. does not ' In an action of deceit the plaintiff cannot establish a title to deceive is re]jef simply by ..."

4. South Eastern Reporter by West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, West Publishing Company, South Carolina Supreme Court (1904)
"... from Its nature and the course of business It might deceive another as having been executed by "JM Haywood." State v. Covington, 94 NC 913, 55 Am. Rep. ..."

5. The Invasion of the Crimea: Its Origin and an Account of Its Progress Down by Alexander William Kinglake (1863)
"... to exe- ineffec- cute the orders addressed to them, they saw the tempts of importance of endeavouring to veil their project from to deceive the enemy. ..."

6. Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the High Court of Chancery: From by Francis Vesey, Great Britain Court of Chancery (1827)
"It took place with full knowledge view to deceive that they were not settled ; and that the Defendant abso- him, but to a lutely refused, notwithstanding a ..."

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