Definition of Crepuscle

1. Noun. The time of day immediately following sunset. "They finished before the fall of night"

Exact synonyms: Crepuscule, Dusk, Evenfall, Fall, Gloam, Gloaming, Nightfall, Twilight
Group relationships: Eve, Even, Evening, Eventide
Specialized synonyms: Night
Generic synonyms: Hour, Time Of Day
Derivative terms: Crepuscular, Crepuscular, Dusky



Definition of Crepuscle

1. n. Twilight.

Definition of Crepuscle

1. Noun. variant of crepuscule ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Crepuscle

1. [n -S]

Crepuscle Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Crepuscle

crepitant
crepitant rale
crepitate
crepitated
crepitates
crepitating
crepitation
crepitation rale
crepitations
crepitous
crepitus
creplach
crepon
crepons
crept
crepuscle (current term)
crepuscles
crepuscular
crepuscular ray
crepuscular rays
crepuscularities
crepuscularity
crepuscularly
crepuscule
crepuscules
crepusculine
crepusculous
crepusculum
crepy
crerarite

Literary usage of Crepuscle

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Essay Towards a Dictionary, Tibetan and English by Sándor Kőrösi Csoma, Saṅs-rgyas-phun-tshogs (1834)
"U'^aj'^z, to be the custom, fashion. QSX'Z^x, to become a custom. j, adj. customary. , adj. unusual, uncommon. J, s. crepuscle, twilight, ..."

2. The Popular Science Monthly (1877)
"He is, however, of the opinion that it may have been overlooked or mistaken for the crepuscle at early dawn or twilight. It has been supposed that Pliny, ..."

3. Shelburne Essays by Paul Elmer More (1908)
"There was in all these poets an unusual age-consciousness; the glory of Greece was behind them, and they wrote in a sort of crepuscle, awaiting the night. ..."

4. Characters and Events of Roman History, from Caesar to Nero: The Lowell by Guglielmo Ferrero (1909)
"... in marrying Cleopatra, probably only applied more or less shrewdly the ideas that Caesar had originated in the refulgent crepuscle of his tempestuous ..."

5. Essay Towards a Dictionary, Tibetan and English by Sándor Kőrösi Csoma, Saṅs-rgyas-phun-tshogs (1834)
"U'^aj'^z, to be the custom, fashion. QSX'Z^x, to become a custom. j, adj. customary. , adj. unusual, uncommon. J, s. crepuscle, twilight, ..."

6. The Popular Science Monthly (1877)
"He is, however, of the opinion that it may have been overlooked or mistaken for the crepuscle at early dawn or twilight. It has been supposed that Pliny, ..."

7. Shelburne Essays by Paul Elmer More (1908)
"There was in all these poets an unusual age-consciousness; the glory of Greece was behind them, and they wrote in a sort of crepuscle, awaiting the night. ..."

8. Characters and Events of Roman History, from Caesar to Nero: The Lowell by Guglielmo Ferrero (1909)
"... in marrying Cleopatra, probably only applied more or less shrewdly the ideas that Caesar had originated in the refulgent crepuscle of his tempestuous ..."

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