Definition of Crenations

1. Noun. (plural of crenation) ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Crenations

1. crenation [n] - See also: crenation

Crenations Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Crenations

crena clunium
crena cordis
crenarchaea
crenarchaeal
crenarchaeon
crenarchaeota
crenarchaeotal
crenarchaeote
crenas
crenate
crenate leaf
crenated
crenately
crenates
crenation
crenations (current term)
crenature
crenatures
crenel
crenelate
crenelated
crenelated molding
crenelated moldings
crenelates
crenelating
crenelation
crenelations
creneled
creneling
crenellate

Literary usage of Crenations

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Monograph of the British Desmidiaceæ by William West, George Stephen West, Nellie Carter (1908)
"crenate than in C. speciosum and allied species, and the crenations are slightly emarginate. The row of short vertically disposed ribs across the base of ..."

2. The Cultivated Oranges and Lemons, Etc. of India and Ceylon: With Researches by Emanuel Bonavia (1888)
"These crenations or serrations, whatever botanists may like to call them, ... On the edges of its leaves it has large crenations, with what I would call ..."

3. Annals and Magazine of Natural History by William Jardine (1842)
"In it the leaves are obovate, with large blunt crenations and a very decided cartilaginous margin. My fig. 2. and 3. represent the leaves which most nearly ..."

4. The Structure and Life-history of the Hay-scented Fern by Henry Shoemaker Conard (1908)
"The crenations develop as the leaf unfolds. The number of pinnae varies ... The uppermost "pinnae" are mere crenations of the margin of a winged rachis. ..."

5. Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, Exhibiting a View of the Progressive by Robert Jameson, Sir William Jardine, Henry D Rogers (1855)
"A distinct raised line traverses the centre of these tracks, and the interval between this line and the crenations is marked by a succession of other lines ..."

6. Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal (1855)
"A distinct raised line traverses the centre of these tracks, and the interval between this line and the crenations is marked hy a succession of other lines ..."

7. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences by Southern Society for Clinical Investigation (U.S.) (1868)
"If rouleaux of very adhesive corpuscles be watched whilst drying, they will be seen to undergo the following changes : First, the well-known crenations ..."

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