Definition of Chase

1. Noun. The act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture. "The culprit started to run and the cop took off in pursuit"

Exact synonyms: Following, Pursual, Pursuit
Generic synonyms: Motion, Move, Movement
Specialized synonyms: Tracking, Trailing, Shadowing, Tailing, Stalk, Stalking
Derivative terms: Follow, Follow, Pursue



2. Verb. Go after with the intent to catch. "They chase the car down the avenue"; "The dog chased the rabbit"
Exact synonyms: Chase After, Dog, Give Chase, Go After, Tag, Tail, Track, Trail
Specialized synonyms: Tree, Quest, Hound, Hunt, Trace, Run Down
Generic synonyms: Follow, Pursue
Also: Chase Away, Tag Along
Derivative terms: Chaser, Chaser, Tag, Tail, Tailing, Track, Tracker, Tracking, Trailing

3. Noun. United States politician and jurist who served as chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1808-1873).

4. Verb. Pursue someone sexually or romantically. "Sam cannot chase Sue "
Exact synonyms: Chase After
Generic synonyms: Court, Romance, Solicit, Woo

5. Noun. A rectangular metal frame used in letterpress printing to hold together the pages or columns of composed type that are printed at one time.
Generic synonyms: Frame

6. Verb. Cut a groove into. ; "Chase silver"
Generic synonyms: Cut

7. Verb. Cut a furrow into a columns.
Exact synonyms: Chamfer, Furrow
Generic synonyms: Cut
Derivative terms: Chamfer

Definition of Chase

1. v. t. To pursue for the purpose of killing or taking, as an enemy, or game; to hunt.

2. v. i. To give chase; to hunt; as, to chase around after a doctor.

3. n. Vehement pursuit for the purpose of killing or capturing, as of an enemy, or game; an earnest seeking after any object greatly desired; the act or habit of hunting; a hunt.

4. n. A rectangular iron frame in which pages or columns of type are imposed.

5. v. t. To ornament (a surface of metal) by embossing, cutting away parts, and the like.

Definition of Chase

1. Proper noun. (surname from=Middle English dot=) from a (etyl enm) nickname for a hunter. ¹

2. Proper noun. (surnames male given name) of modern usage, transferred from the surname. ¹

3. Noun. The action of the verb "to chase". ¹

4. Noun. A hunt. ¹

5. Noun. (British) A large country estate where game may be shot or hunted. ¹

6. Noun. Anything being chased, especially a vessel in time of war. ¹

7. Noun. (nautical) Any of the guns that fire directly ahead or astern; either a bow chase or stern chase. ¹

8. Noun. A metal frame in which metal type and blocks are placed and held ready to print by letterpress. ¹

9. Noun. (context: real tennis) The occurrence of a second bounce by the ball in certain areas of the court, giving the server the chance, later in the game, to "play off" the chase from the receiving end and possibly win the point. ¹

10. Verb. (transitive) To pursue, to follow at speed. ¹

11. Verb. (transitive) To hunt. ¹

12. Verb. (transitive nautical) To pursue a vessel in order to destroy, capture or interrogate her ¹

13. Verb. (transitive cricket) To attempt to win by scoring the required number of runs in the final innings. ¹

14. Verb. (transitive baseball) To swing at a pitch outside of the strike zone, typically an outside pitch ¹

15. Verb. (transitive baseball) To produce enough offense to cause the pitcher to be removed ¹

16. Noun. (printing) A rectangular steel or iron frame into which pages or columns of type are locked for printing or plate making. ¹

17. Noun. A groove cut in an object; a slot: the chase for the quarrel on a crossbow. ¹

18. Noun. A trench or channel for drainpipes or wiring. ¹

19. Noun. The part of a gun in front of the trunnions. ¹

20. Noun. The cavity of a mold. ¹

21. Verb. (transitive) To groove; indent. ¹

22. Verb. (transitive) To cut (the thread of a screw). ¹

23. Verb. (transitive) To decorate (metal) by engraving or embossing. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Chase

1. to pursue [v CHASED, CHASING, CHASES] - See also: pursue

Chase Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Chase

charts
chartularies
chartulary
charva
charvas
charver
charvers
charvette
charvettes
charwoman
charwomen
chary
charybdotoxin
chas
chasable
chase (current term)
chase a rainbow
chase after
chase away
chase down
chase gun
chase guns
chase off
chase plane
chase port
chase up
chaseable
chased
chaser

Literary usage of Chase

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Court of King's Bench: With by Richard Vaughan Barnewall, Great Britain Court of King's Bench, Edward Hall Alderson, William Selwyn (1818)
"defendant undertook to put Wm. chase the younger into '" order *° !• 4. 1 J charge a per- the custody of the sheriff on or before Saturday then i°n with the ..."

2. The Connecticut Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly by William Farrand Felch, George C. Atwell, H. Phelps Arms, Frances Trevelyan Miller (1897)
"455 of Amos Otis Papers on Barnstable Families it is stated that John chase m. Mercy (b. about 1670) Hall, dau. of Gersham (John Sr.) and Bethia ..."

3. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register by Henry Fritz-Gilbert Waters (1847)
"Thus, we find in 1326 a family of that name in Suffolk; a Thomas chase, who was barbarously murdered in 1506; a Sir Robert chase, Knight, in the West of ..."

4. The American Historical Review by American Historical Association (1903)
"In these cases chase seems almost always to have been deeply moved by loyalty to ... chase probably agreed with a correspondent in St. Louis, that there was ..."

5. The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including the Series by Alexander Chalmers, Samuel Johnson (1810)
"From him, ye British youths, a vigorous race, Imbibe the various science of the chase; And while the well-plann'cl system you admire, Kn'iw Brunswick only ..."

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